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Current Filters: Author:Phillips, Deborah A. [remove]; Classification:Behavior/Social & Emotional Development/Socialization [remove];

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Double Jeopardy: Poorer social-emotional outcomes for children in the NICHD SECCYD experiencing home and child-care environments that confer risk
Watamura, Sarah, January/February 2011
Child Development, 82(1), 48-65

A study of the relationships between both home and child care quality and the socioemotional adjustment of groups of children in five different environments at ages 24, 36, and 54 months, based on a secondary analysis of data from 771 children

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High-quality preschool enhances social-emotional development
Gormley, Jr., William T., April, 2010
Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the United States.

A summary of an examination of the effects of participation in early childhood education programs in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on children's socioemotional development at kindergarten entry

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The import of the cortisol rise in child care differs as a function of behavioral inhibition
Gunnar, Megan R., May 2011
Developmental Psychology, 47(3), 792-803

An investigation of the association between rising cortisol levels of children in child care and their development of anxious, internalized, and inhibited behaviors, after controlling for home environment and child care quality, based on assessments of 107 children aged 3 through 4.5

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Reactive temperament and sensitivity to context in childcare
Phillips, Deborah A., August, 2012
Social Development, 21(3), 628-643

A study of the relationship between toddlers' temperaments and variations in both child care quality and hours in care with peers, based on data from a subset of 66 children from the Temperament Over Time Study (TOTS), followed from the ages of 4 months through 2 years, and additional data from their teachers and parents

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The relations between infant negative reactivity, non-maternal childcare, and children's interactions with familiar and unfamiliar peers
Almas, Alisa N., November, 2011
Social Development, 20(4), 718-740

A study of the relationships among children's temperament, experience of non-maternal child care, and behavior toward unfamiliar peers, based on child temperament data at 4 months, data from parents and observations of their 113 children at 24 months, and child observations in the laboratory with an unfamiliar peer at 24 and 36 months

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The rise in cortisol in family day care: Associations with aspects of care quality, child behavior, and child sex
Gunner, Megan, May/June 2010
Child Development, 81(3), 851–869

A comparison between salivary cortisol, a stress response indicator, measured mid-morning to mid-afternoon at home and while in attendance at full-time home based child care, and an examination of the relationships between cortisol levels and child care quality, sex, and child behavior, for 151 children ages 3- through 5-years-old

Reports & Papers


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Social-emotional effects of early childhood education programs in Tulsa
Gormley, Jr., William T., November/December 2011
Child Development, 82(6), 2095-2109

An examination of the relationship of participation in early childhood education programs to children's socioemotional development at kindergarten entry, based on a sample of 1,318 kindergarteners who had participated in the Tulsa Public Schools prekindergarten program, 363 who had participated in the Community Action Project (CAP) Tulsa County Head Start program, and 1,151 who had participated in neither program

Reports & Papers


Social-emotional effects of early childhood education programs in Tulsa
Gormley, Jr., William T., 2009
Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the United States.

An examination of the effects of participation in early childhood education programs on children’s socioemotional development at kindergarten entry, based on a sample of 3,127 kindergarteners who had participated in the Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) prekindergarten program or the Community Action Project (CAP) Tulsa County Head Start program

Reports & Papers


Social-emotional effects of early childhood education programs in Tulsa
Gormley, Jr., William T., January, 2011
(CROCUS Working Paper No. 15). Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the United States.

An examination of the relationship of participation in early childhood education programs to children's socioemotional development at kindergarten entry, based on a sample of 1,318 kindergarteners who had participated in the Tulsa Public Schools prekindergarten program, 363 who had participated in the Community Action Project (CAP) Tulsa County Head Start program, and 1,151 who had participated in neither program

Reports & Papers


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Teacher-child interaction and child-care auspices as predictors of social outcomes in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers
McCartney, Kathleen, 1997
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 43(3), 426-450

A study of the association between teacher-child interaction and children's social outcomes in infants and toddlers enrolled in 120 faith-based, for-profit and nonprofit center-based child care in three states (Massachusetts, Virginia, and Georgia)

Reports & Papers


Written testimony of Deborah A. Phillips
Phillips, Deborah A., 2002
In The dawn of learning: What's working in early childhood education: Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education Reform of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives. 107th Cong., 1st Sess.

A discussion of the Neurons to Neighborhoods report about relations between experiences in early child care settings and child competencies

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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