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Current Filters: Author:Belsky, Jay [remove]; Classification:Behavior/Social & Emotional Development/Socialization [remove];

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Are insecure-avoidant infants with extensive day-care experience less stressed by and more independent in the Strange Situation
Belsky, Jay, 1991
Child Development, 62(3), 567-571

A study of the relationship between child reactions to stressful situations and the amount of non-parental child care experienced by the child in his or her first year, in a sample of 20 insecure-avoidant infants

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Are there long-term effects of early child care?
Belsky, Jay, March/April 2007
Child Development, 78(2), 681-701

An analysis of the links between early child care and school-age children's development, socioemotional functioning, and academic performance, based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

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Classroom composition, childcare history and social development: Are childcare effects disappearing or spreading?
Belsky, Jay, February 2009
Social Development, 18(1), 230-238

A summary of evidence from a study of the association between the aggregate child care experiences of classrooms of children and the externalization of problem behaviors in the primary school years

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Differential susceptibility to long-term effects of quality of child care on externalizing behavior in adolescence?
Belsky, Jay, January, 2012
International Journal of Behavioral Development, 36(1), 2-10

An examination of the moderating influence of temperament in infancy on the relationship between child care quality and problem behavior in 15-year-old adolescents, based on data from 842 participants in the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD)

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Do time in child care and peer group exposure predict poor socioemotional adjustment in Norway?
Solheim, Elisabet, September/October 2013
Child Development, 84(5), 1701-1715

A study of the relationship between socioemotional functioning and exposure to non-parental child care and large peer groups during the first 4.5 years of life, based on data from 935 young children with an average age of 55 months from Trondheim, Norway

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Early and extensive maternal employment and young children's socioemotional development: Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Belsky, Jay, 1991
Journal of Marriage and the Family, 53(4), 1083-1098

A study of the influence of maternal employment on the socioemotional development of four to six year old children whose mothers were studied as part of the NSLY

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Emanuel Miller Lecture: Developmental risks (still) associated with early child care
Belsky, Jay, 2001
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 42(7), 845-859

A review of evidence on the effects of timing and quantity of child care on attachment and socioemotional development.

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Nonmaternal care in the first year of life and the security of infant-parent attachment
Belsky, Jay, 1993
In R. A. Pierce & M. A. Black (Eds.), Life-span development: A diversity reader (pp. 17-30). Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing

A study of whether extensive nonmaternal care in the first year is associated with heightened risk of insecure infant-parent attachment

Reports & Papers


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Parental and nonparental child care and children's socioemotional development: A decade in review
Belsky, Jay, 1990
Journal of Marriage and the Family, 52(4), 885-903

A review of literature from the 1980s on the influence of parent-child interaction, parent characteristics and the links between parent-child relationships or peer relationships on the socioemotional development of infants, preschool and school aged children, including a review of the six waves of research on the outcomes of non-parental care

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Predicting service use for mental health problems among young children
Wichstrom, Lars, June, 2014
Pediatrics, 133(6), 1054-1060

Objective: To identify sociodemographic, child, parent, and day care provider factors at age 4 that predict Norwegian children's service use for mental health problems at age 7. Method: Two birth cohorts of 4-year-old children and their parents living in the city of Trondheim, Norway, were invited (82% consented). We successfully interviewed 995 parents among 1250 drawn to participate using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment to set diagnoses and record parental burden and service use. Information concerning sociodemographics, child impairment, parental social support, and child need for mental health services according to parents, day care teacher, and health nurse were obtained. Results: Rate of service use among those with a behavioral or emotional disorder was 10.7% at age 4 and 25.2% at age 7. Behavioral disorders (odds ratio [OR] 2.6, confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.3), but not emotional disorders, predicted service use. When adjusted for incapacity (OR 1.3, CI 1.2-1.6), disorders were no longer predictive. Incapacity, in turn, was not predictive once parental burden (OR 1.1, CI 1.0-1.1) and parents' (OR 2.7, CI 1.0-7.9) and day care teachers' (OR 2.1, CI 1.4-3.2) judgment of child need of help were included. Lower socioeconomic status predicted more service use over and beyond these factors (OR 3.0, CI 1.5-6.1). Conclusions: Behavioral disorders may instigate service use if they result in impairment, and such impairment may operate via increased parental burden and parent and caregiver problem recognition. Service use may be increased through effective screening programs and efforts to increase day care teachers' recognition of emotional problems. (author abstract)

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Preschoolers' psychosocial problems: In the eyes of the beholder? adding teacher characteristics as determinants of discrepant parent-teacher reports
Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne, June, 2012
Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 43(3), 393-413

In this study, we explored informant characteristics as determinants of parent-teacher disagreement on preschoolers' psychosocial problems. Teacher characteristics were included in the analyses, in addition to child and parent factors. Psychosocial problems of 732 4-year olds from a Norwegian community sample were assessed by parents and teachers (CBCL-TRF). Furthermore, teachers reported on their education, experience and relationship to the child. Parental stress and psychopathology were also measured. Teachers rated children considerably lower than their parents did, especially on internalizing problems. When teachers rated more child problems, this was strongly associated with conflict in the teacher-child relationship, which predicted disagreement more than other factors. The highest agreement was on boys' externalizing problems. Girls' behavior was rated much lower by teachers than boys' behavior compared to parents' ratings. Possible teacher perception biases are discussed, such as teacher-child conflict, non-identification of internalizing problems, and same-gender child preference. (author abstract)

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Quantity counts: Amount of child care and children's socioemotional development
Belsky, Jay, 2002
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 23(3), 167-170

A commentary on findings from the Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care about the effects of the quantity of nonmaternal care on child behavioral outcomes.

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Quantity of nonmaternal care and boys' problem behavior/adjustment at ages 3 and 5: Exploring the mediating role of parenting
Belsky, Jay, 1999
Psychiatry, 62(1), 1-20

A study of the social and cognitive effect of nonmaternal care and the mediating effect of parenting on nonmaternal care for children ages three to five

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Testing a series of causal propositions relating time in child care to children’s externalizing behavior
McCartney, Kathleen, January 2010
Developmental Psychology, 46(1), 1-17

An examination, through a series of longitudinal analyses, of the relationship between child care hours and externalizing behavior, moderated by child care quality and portion of time with a large group of peers, from 1,364 family participants in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

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