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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families: Volume II. Technical report appendixes
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A compendium of studies on the influence of participation in an Early Head Start program on children’s outcomes

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Child care quality matters: How conclusions may vary with context
Love, John M., 2003
Child Development, 74(4), 1021-1033

An analysis of three national studies on child care quality and the impact of quality on child development

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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Data collection instruments for the evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment cross-site evaluation
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, April, 2012
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. CB/ACF funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to conduct a participatory- and utilization-focused cross-site evaluation of the grantees' EBHV programs. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The design for the EBHV cross-site evaluation is described in a design report published in 2009 (Koball et. al). This document is a companion piece to that design report. It provides data collection instruments used in the evaluation during 2010 and 2011. Protocols for site visits conducted in 2010 are in Section I. Instruments used to collect data on system change and infrastructure building appear in Section II. Section III contains instruments developed to collect data on model fidelity. The time use survey administered as part of the cost study is in Section IV. Finally, Section V contains protocols for site visits conducted in 2012. (author abstract)

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Design options for the assessment of Head Start quality enhancements: Final report. Volume I
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 2005
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A study of quality enhancement and assessment designs for Head Start programs

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The economic rationale for investing in children: A focus on child care
Paulsell, Diane, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A summary of proceedings from a conference on “The Economic Rationale for Investing in Children: A Focus on Child Care”

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The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers: Appendixes
Paulsell, Diane, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A supplement to the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project report containing details on the agencies studied and protocols used

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Evaluating implementation of quality rating and improvement systems
Paulsell, Diane, 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 269-293). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of early care and education quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS), and an application of implementation science and systems theory to QRIS design, monitoring, and implementation

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Evaluating systems change efforts to support evidence-based home visiting: Concepts and methods
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 01 September, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grants with other funding sources to support the implementation of EBHV programs with fidelity, the scaling up of these high-fidelity home visiting models, and the sustainability of the models. Grantees must also conduct local implementation, outcome, and economic evaluations. CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to conduct a participatory and utilization-focused cross-site evaluation of the grantees? initiatives over the next six years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The MPR-Chapin Hall (MPR-CH) cross-site evaluation will focus on four domains: fidelity, costs, systems, and family and child outcomes. The systems domain evaluation relies on system-based evaluation concepts and methods, articulating a theory of infrastructure change that incorporates key system attributes. This memo provides a literature review for the systems domain evaluation. This literature review is not an exhaustive review of complex systems theory or of the EBHV implementation, scale-up, and sustainability literature. Instead, it focuses on three aspects of the systems domain evaluation: (1) the system-based evaluation approach and theory of change, (2) core EBHV infrastructure concepts, and (3) system-based evaluation methods. (author abstract)

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A guide to emerging strategies for promoting prevention and improving oral health care delivery in Head Start: Lessons from the Oral Health Initiative evaluation: Vol II. Final report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, June 25, 2008
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Emerging strategies and lessons learned from final findings of a two-year implementation evaluation of the Head Start Oral Health Initiative, which provided grants to Head Start programs to design and implement oral health promotion strategies, based on interviews with program directors, a web-based record-keeping system for grantees, and site visits

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Lessons learned from the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 31 January, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Lessons learned from a review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5

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Making a difference in the lives of infants and toddlers and their families: The impacts of Early Head Start: Vol. II. Final technical report appendixes
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2002
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The appendices and data analysis of the impact of Early Head Start in the lives of infants and toddlers and their families

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Public investment in education: Lessons for child care policy
Rivkin, Steven, 2001
In D. Paulsell (Ed.), The economic rationale for investing in children: A focus on child care. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

An exploration of the quality of early childhood education and care, with recommendations for government and public policy interventions

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Quality care for low-income infants and toddlers: A study of community strategies
Paulsell, Diane, 2002
Zero to Three, 22(4), 44-49

A summary of research on how Early Head Start-child care partnerships help low-income families overcome barriers to child care access.

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Quality child care for infants and toddlers from families with low incomes: Lessons learned from three communities
Paulsell, Diane, 2003
Zero to Three, 23(4), 4-10

An examination of community-level strategies to improve child care quality and affordability, based on case studies of three communities with Head Start programs in El Paso County in Colorado, Buncombe County in North Carolina, and the program in Kansas City, Kansas and Sedalia, Missouri

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Rationales for public sector training and other investments in labor markets and their applicability to public investments in child care
Hollister, Robinson, 2001
In D. Paulsell (Ed.), The economic rationale for investing in children: A focus on child care. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A synthesis of arguments for public investment in education and training and the application of these arguments to that of public investment in child care

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Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Overview of the cross-site evaluation
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

An overview of the cross-site evaluation design and program models of 17 grantees participating in the implementation of evidence-based home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment

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Sustaining employment among low income parents: The problems of inflexible jobs, child care and family support: A research review
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 31 December, 1998
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A review of research examining the relationship between employment retention and flexibility in family support, jobs, and child care arrangements among low-income families

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Sustaining employment among low income parents: The role of quality in child care: A research review: Final
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 1998
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A review of research on the relationship between child care quality and low income parents' employment decisions, addressing issues of quality definition, measurement, perspectives, availability, cost, and policy, with recommendations for further study

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What can we learn about child care policy from public investments in children's health?
Currie, Janet, 2001
In D. Paulsell (Ed.), The economic rationale for investing in children: A focus on child care. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A comparison of child health policy to child care policy, with an emphasis on the role of the family and children’s well-being

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Where did the children go after Early Head Start?
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., 2004
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A study of the arrangements and impact of Early Head Start children who enrolled in prekindergarten programs

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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