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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

An interim report of the random assignment, impact evaluation of the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation project, analyzing child and family outcomes through the first two years of children's lives.

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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families: Volume I. Technical report
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

An evaluation of the effectiveness of Early Head Start programs in improving children's outcomes, based on a national assessment of 3,000 children at 17 sites

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A compilation of initiatives to support home-based child care
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 31, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A compilation of profiles of 96 initiatives that target and support home-based child care

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Evidence-based home visiting systems evaluation update: Infrastructure-building plans and activities in 2011
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 07 December, 2012
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

This report provides a snapshot of subcontractors' plans for achieving their targeted outcomes and the EBHV goals and their actual infrastructure-building activities in year 3 of the initiative, roughly at the midpoint of implementation. EBHV subcontractors are operating in complex, dynamic, and unpredictable environments. As they adapt to these changing conditions, their plans and activities change, potentially altering the initiative's outcomes. Tracking these changing conditions and the evolution of subcontractors' plans and activities as they adapt can provide a rich picture of how complex system interventions operate over time and provide lessons and guidance for how to build infrastructure capacity that supports implementation with fidelity, scale-up, and sustainability of EBHV programs. This brief snapshot adds to earlier work by the cross-site evaluation team that documented subcontractor plans at the end of a one-year planning period and infrastructure-building activities during the planning and early implementation period. The report addresses two main research questions at approximately the midpoint of the funding period: 1. What EBHV initiative goals did subcontractors expect to achieve, and how did they plan to do so? What people and institutions did they expect to engage at each infrastructure level? What infrastructure-building strategies did they expect to implement? What infrastructure-building short-term results and long-term outcomes did they expect to achieve? 2. In what types of infrastructure-building activities did subcontractors actually engage? How were subcontractors' activities influenced by economic and other contextual factors? How did infrastructure-building activities change over time? What were subcontractors' perceived successes in progressing toward their targeted infrastructure-building outcomes and the EBHV goals? What challenges and barriers impeded subcontractors' progress toward their targeted infrastructure-building outcomes and the EBHV goals? (author abstract)

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Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs: Volume I: Cross-site perspectives
United States. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, December 1999
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families.

A description of the characteristics and early implementation experiences of the 17 research programs participating in the National Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project in fall 1997, with a focus on similarities and differences across programs in the characteristics of the families they serve, their goals and expected outcomes, the services they offer, and their early challenges and successes

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Making a difference in the lives of infants and toddlers and their families: The impacts of Early Head Start: Vol. I. Final technical report
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2002
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A report of the findings from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation project, a large-scale, random-assignment evaluation of the impact of Early Head Start programs on the development of infants and toddlers, and the parenting and family development of low-income families across the US

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Making replication work: Building infrastructure to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs with fidelity
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, January, 2014
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, conducted a national cross-site evaluation of the EBHV initiative. Using a mixed-methods approach, the national cross-site evaluation was designed to (1) examine the degree to which system change occurred, (2) document the fidelity with which the program models were implemented, and (3) identify implementation strategies and challenges. Ultimately, the evaluation examined the degree to which building infrastructure capacity influenced whether the EBHV subcontractors were able to achieve their EBHV goals related to implementation with fidelity, scale-up, and sustainability. The evaluation also examined whether progress achieving these goals was influenced by the quality of the collaboration among partners, the extent to which partners worked together, and the degree to which partners' respective goals were in alignment. This final evaluation report brings together findings from all years of the EBHV initiative, drawing on interim reports and briefings and updating results with analyses of data collected through the initiative's first four years of implementation (fall 2009 through spring 2013). Throughout the initiative, the national cross-site evaluation gathered data from many sources, including reviews of the subcontractor's applications and progress reports, several rounds of telephone interviews and two rounds of site visits with the EBHV subcontractors, baseline and followup surveys of the EBHV subcontractors and their partners, and data on staff and participant characteristics and service delivery from the implementing agencies (IAs) identified by the subcontractors. The primary data sources for this report include: (1) site visits conducted to the 17 EBHV subcontractors between February and April 2012; (2) data on staff and participant characteristics and service delivery from October 1, 2009, through June 30, 2012; and (3) a web-based survey of key partners fielded in February 2013. (author abstract)

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Oral health promotion, prevention, & treatment strategies for Head Start families: Early findings from the Oral Health Initiative evaluation: Vol. II. Site profiles
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, September 05, 2007
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Interim findings from a two-year implementation evaluation of the Head Start Oral Health Initiative, which provided grants to Head Start programs to design and implement oral health promotion strategies, based on 1) interviews with program directors, 2) a web-based record-keeping system for grantees, and 3) site visits. This volume is based on data from the first source

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Pathways to quality and full implementation in Early Head Start programs
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2002
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A report characterizing the development of Early Head Start programs over the first four years of the program's existence.

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Strategies for promoting prevention and improving oral health care delivery in Head Start: Findings from the Oral Health Initiative evaluation: Vol I. Final technical report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, October 01, 2008
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Final findings from a two-year implementation evaluation of the Head Start Oral Health Initiative, which provided grants to Head Start programs to design and implement oral health promotion strategies, based on interviews with program directors, a web-based record-keeping system for grantees, and site visits

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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