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Preliminary findings from the literature review presented at the technical work group meeting for the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 06 May, 2014
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The literature review is designed to guide the theory of change and measurement framework for the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships and to inform future research and practice. The literature review is examining the following five research questions: 1. What are the characteristics and/or components of partnerships? 2. What are the potential benefits of partnerships to programs, providers, and families? 3. What are common barriers to forming and sustaining partnerships? 4. What factors may facilitate partnerships (such as funding supports, policies and procedures, technical assistance, or other infrastructure supports)? What are promising models or features of partnerships that the research literature suggests have the potential to improve quality and support child development and family well-being? 5. What are the gaps of the existing literature? To answer these questions, we reviewed research on partnerships in the field of early childhood education, such as partnerships among Head Start/Early Head Start, child care, and state prekindergarten programs. The review included studies that examined two or more entities partnering to plan and implement direct early childhood care and education (ECE) services. We included journal articles as well as unpublished and non-peer-reviewed materials (such as project reports and white papers) published in the past 15 years (January 1, 1998 through December 31, 2013). We chose this timeframe to capture studies conducted since welfare reform was enacted in 1996, which included work and workforce development requirements for welfare recipients. This requirement meant that many more low-income families needed child care for infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children while they worked or participated in education and training programs. (author abstract)

Literature Review


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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