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Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report describes the findings from the review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The original review was conducted in fall 2010 and the report was released in February 2011. This report was updated in August 2011 based on additional studies identified through an updated literature search conducted in spring 2011. (author abstract)

Literature Review


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Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities: Final report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, February 04, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5 in tribal communities or with samples that included substantial proportions of American Indian and Alaska Native participants

Literature Review


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Assessing the need for evidence-based home visiting (EBHV): Experiences of EBHV grantees
Paulsell, Diane, July, 2010
(Brief 1). Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, authorized by Section 2951 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-148), will provide $1.5 billion to states over five years to provide comprehensive, evidence-based home visiting services to improve a range of outcomes for families and children residing in at-risk communities (due to high rates of poverty, violence, poor health outcomes, and other factors). To receive the funds, each state must conduct a statewide needs assessment that (1) identifies at-risk communities, (2) assesses the state's capacity to provide substance abuse treatment and counseling, and (3) documents the quality and capacity of existing early childhood home visiting programs as well as gaps in these services. A number of the grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment grantee cluster prepared needs assessments to plan for implementing or expanding grant-related evidence-based home visiting services. This brief provides information about how grantees planned the assessments and collected the data, as well as facilitators and barriers to carrying out the assessments. It also describes lessons identified by grantees. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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The Atlantic Philanthropies' Disadvantaged Children and Youth program in Ireland and Northern Ireland: Overview of program evaluation findings: Final report
Paulsell, Diane, January 30, 2009
New York: Atlantic Philanthropies.

An evaluation of Disadvantaged Children and Youth, a program in Ireland and Northern Ireland to improve the lives of disadvantaged children by improving service delivery through evidence-based services and prevention and early intervention strategies, based on semistructured interviews with key informants and on a research and policy review

Reports & Papers


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The Atlantic Philanthropies' Disadvantaged Children and Youth program in Ireland and Northern Ireland: Overview of program evaluation findings: Final report [Executive summary]
Paulsell, Diane, January 30, 2009
New York: Atlantic Philanthropies.

A summary of an evaluation of Disadvantaged Children and Youth, a program in Ireland and Northern Ireland to improve the lives of disadvantaged children by improving service delivery through evidence-based services and prevention and early intervention strategies, based on semistructured interviews with key informants and on a research and policy review

Executive Summary


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Better beginnings: Developing home-based early learning systems in East Yakima and White Center
Hallgren, Kristin, April, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of the development and implementation of home visiting program models in White City and East Yakima, Washington

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Better beginnings: Partnering with families for early learning home visit observations
Hallgren, Kristin, April, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of a study of the content and quality of home visits conducted through Partnering with Families for Early Learning, a home visiting program developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

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Better beginnings: The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Impact evaluation findings
Boller, Kimberley, July, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Findings from an impact evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

Fact Sheets & Briefs


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Better beginnings: The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Implementation lessons
Del Grosso, Patricia, July, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Lessons from the implementation evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

Fact Sheets & Briefs


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Better beginnings: The state of early learning and kindergarten readiness in East Yakima
Paulsell, Diane, August, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

An overview of children, families, school readiness, and early learning services and quality in East Yakima, Washington, prior to the start of the East Yakima Early Learning Initiative, part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State

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Better beginnings: The state of early learning and kindergarten readiness in East Yakima and White Center
Paulsell, Diane, August, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

An overview of children, families, school readiness, and early learning services and quality in East Yakima and White Center, Washington, prior to the start of the East Yakima and White Center Early Learning Initiatives, parts of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State

Fact Sheets & Briefs


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Better beginnings: The state of early learning and kindergarten readiness in White Center
Paulsell, Diane, August, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

An overview of children, families, school readiness, and early learning services and quality in White Center, Washington, prior to the start of the White Center Early Learning Initiative (WCELI), part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State

Fact Sheets & Briefs


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Building a community-wide early learning system: East Yakima at baseline
Del Grosso, Patricia, 05 May, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Baseline findings from a multi-year implementation evaluation, one of four components in an overall evaluation, of the East Yakima Early Learning Initiative, part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State, that examined the East Yakima community, the availability and quality of child care services there, the East Yakima Early Learning Initiative planning process, and the community's goals and expectations for East Yakima Early Learning Initiative implementation

Reports & Papers


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Building a community-wide early learning system: East Yakima at baseline [Executive summary]
Del Grosso, Patricia, 05 May, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of baseline findings from a multi-year implementation evaluation, one of four components in an overall evaluation, of the East Yakima Early Learning Initiative, part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State, that examined the East Yakima community, the availability and quality of child care services there, the East Yakima Early Learning Initiative planning process, and the community's goals and expectations for East Yakima Early Learning Initiative implementation

Executive Summary


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Building a community-wide early learning system: White Center at baseline
Paulsell, Diane, 05 May, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Baseline findings from a multi-year implementation evaluation, one of four components in an overall evaluation, of the White Center Early Learning Initiative (WCELI), part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State, that examined the White Center community, the availability and quality of child care services there, the WCELI planning process, and the community's goals and expectations for WCELI implementation

Reports & Papers


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Building a community-wide early learning system: White Center at baseline [Executive summary]
Paulsell, Diane, 05 May, 2008
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of baseline findings from a multi-year implementation evaluation, one of four components in an overall evaluation, of the White Center Early Learning Initiative (WCELI), part of a 10-year strategy to improve children's school readiness in Washington State, that examined the White Center community, the availability and quality of child care services there, the WCELI planning process, and the community's goals and expectations for WCELI implementation

Executive Summary


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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative [Executive summary]
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 April, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

Executive Summary


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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

An interim report of the random assignment, impact evaluation of the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation project, analyzing child and family outcomes through the first two years of children's lives.

Reports & Papers


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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families: Summary report
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A summary of findings from the interim report of the random assignment, impact evaluation of the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation project.

Executive Summary


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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families: Volume II. Technical report appendixes
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A compendium of studies on the influence of participation in an Early Head Start program on children’s outcomes

Other


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Building their futures: How Early Head Start programs are enhancing the lives of infants and toddlers in low-income families: Volume I. Technical report
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

An evaluation of the effectiveness of Early Head Start programs in improving children's outcomes, based on a national assessment of 3,000 children at 17 sites

Reports & Papers


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Child care quality matters: How conclusions may vary with context
Love, John M., 2003
Child Development, 74(4), 1021-1033

An analysis of three national studies on child care quality and the impact of quality on child development

Other


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A compilation of initiatives to support home-based child care
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 31, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A compilation of profiles of 96 initiatives that target and support home-based child care

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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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