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Current Filters: Author:Paulsell, Diane [remove]; Pub Year:2011 [remove];

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Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report describes the findings from the review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The original review was conducted in fall 2010 and the report was released in February 2011. This report was updated in August 2011 based on additional studies identified through an updated literature search conducted in spring 2011. (author abstract)

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Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities: Final report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, February 04, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5 in tribal communities or with samples that included substantial proportions of American Indian and Alaska Native participants

Literature Review


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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative [Executive summary]
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 April, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

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Developing initiatives for home-based child care: Current research and future directions
Porter, Toni, May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 4-13

Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality initiatives for this type of child care. This article summarizes key findings on the prevalence and quality of home-based child care, caregiver characteristics, and quality initiatives and then makes recommendations for future directions. (author abstract)

Literature Review


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Family-sensitive caregiving: A key component of quality in early care and education arrangements
Bromer, Juliet, 2011
In M. Zaslow, I. Martinez-Beck, K. Tout, & T. Halle (Eds.), Quality measurement in early childhood settings (pp. 161-190). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A presentation of a model for the assessment of early childhood education and care providers' attitudes towards, knowledge about, and practices with families with young children

Reports & Papers


Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 15 October, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A summary of a review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5

Executive Summary


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Lessons learned from the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 31 January, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This paper describes key lessons learned from the first year of the HomVEE review about the current state of evidence on the effectiveness of early childhood home visiting, gaps in the research literature that create challenges for assessing effectiveness, and suggestions for strengthening future research in this area. (author abstract)

Other


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Supporting a culture of evidence-based practice and continuous program improvement: A staged approach to implementing and studying international early childhood development programs
Boller, Kimberley, December, 2011
(Working Paper No. 2011-040). Chicago: University of Chicago, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group.

This concept paper proposes a four-stage approach to in-country/region ECD program development, selection, and inquiry designed to build the evidence base required to guide program and policy decisions. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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