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Current Filters: Author:Paulsell, Diane [remove]; Pub Year:2010 [remove];

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Assessing the need for evidence-based home visiting (EBHV): Experiences of EBHV grantees
Paulsell, Diane, July, 2010
(Brief 1). Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, authorized by Section 2951 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-148), will provide $1.5 billion to states over five years to provide comprehensive, evidence-based home visiting services to improve a range of outcomes for families and children residing in at-risk communities (due to high rates of poverty, violence, poor health outcomes, and other factors). To receive the funds, each state must conduct a statewide needs assessment that (1) identifies at-risk communities, (2) assesses the state's capacity to provide substance abuse treatment and counseling, and (3) documents the quality and capacity of existing early childhood home visiting programs as well as gaps in these services. A number of the grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment grantee cluster prepared needs assessments to plan for implementing or expanding grant-related evidence-based home visiting services. This brief provides information about how grantees planned the assessments and collected the data, as well as facilitators and barriers to carrying out the assessments. It also describes lessons identified by grantees. (author abstract)

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Better beginnings: Developing home-based early learning systems in East Yakima and White Center
Hallgren, Kristin, April, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of the development and implementation of home visiting program models in White City and East Yakima, Washington

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Better beginnings: Partnering with families for early learning home visit observations
Hallgren, Kristin, April, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of a study of the content and quality of home visits conducted through Partnering with Families for Early Learning, a home visiting program developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

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Better beginnings: The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Impact evaluation findings
Boller, Kimberley, July, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Findings from an impact evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

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Better beginnings: The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Implementation lessons
Del Grosso, Patricia, July, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

Lessons from the implementation evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington

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A compilation of initiatives to support home-based child care
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 31, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A compilation of profiles of 96 initiatives that target and support home-based child care

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Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 15 November, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A summary of a review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5

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Home Visit Rating Scales-Adapted & Extended
Roggman, Lori A., 2010
Unpublished instrument.

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Recruiting and retaining home visitors for evidence-based home visiting (EBHV): Experiences of EBHV grantees
Coffee-Borden, Brandon, October, 2010
(Brief 2). Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

This brief summarizes lessons about recruiting and training home visitors for evidence-based programs from grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment grantee cluster. As part of the EBHV cross-site evaluation, Mathematica Policy Research collected the data in spring 2010 during a series of telephone interviews conducted with managers of agencies from 9 of the 17 grantees that were implementing home visiting programs. These "implementing agencies" were selected to participate in the interviews because they had recruited, hired, and trained new home visitors during the preceding year (in contrast to some agencies that were already operating programs when the grant began, or had not yet reached the stage of staffing their home visiting programs). Most implementing agencies had experience with home visiting but few had previously implemented an evidence-based program. The brief provides an overview of agencies' strategies for recruiting and training home visitors, as well as the challenges they faced and lessons learned. (author abstract)

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A review of the literature on home-based child care: Implications for future directions: Final
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, January 15, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

An exploration of the use of family and informal child care initiatives to improve children's development and families' outcomes, based on a review of over 135 research articles on past and present family child care interventions

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The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Findings from the impact and implementation studies
Boller, Kimberley, 28 June, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

An implementation and impact evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington, based on pre- and post-treatment program observations and staff surveys and interviews in 14 randomly assigned child care centers and 52 randomly assigned family child care providers

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The Seeds to Success Modified Field Test: Findings from the impact and implementation studies [Executive summary]
Boller, Kimberley, 28 June, 2010
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of an implementation and impact evaluation of Seeds to Success, a quality rating and improvement system developed as part of the Early Learning Initiative in White Center and East Yakima, Washington, based on pre- and post-treatment program observations and staff surveys and interviews in 14 randomly assigned child care centers and 52 randomly assigned family child care providers

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Supporting home visitors in evidence-based programs: Experiences of EBHV grantees
Coffee-Borden, Brandon, December, 2010
(Brief 4). Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

This brief summarizes experiences supporting and supervising home visitors working in evidence-based programs affiliated with grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment initiative. As part of the EBHV cross-site evaluation, Mathematica Policy Research collected the data in spring 2010 during a series of telephone interviews conducted with managers of agencies from 9 of the 17 grantees that were implementing home visiting. These "implementing agencies" were selected to participate in the interviews because they had recruited, hired, and trained new home visitors during the preceding year (in contrast to some agencies that were already operating programs when the grant began, or had not yet reached the stage of staffing their home visiting programs). Most implementing agencies had previous experience with home visiting but few had implemented an evidence-based program. The brief provides an overview of agencies' strategies for supervising and supporting home visitors, as well as the challenges they faced and lessons learned. (author abstract)

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Supporting quality in home-based child care: A compendium of 23 initiatives
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 05, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A compendium of details and descriptions of 23 quality initiatives targeted at home-based child care

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Supporting quality in home-based child care: Final brief
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 31, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Highlights of findings from an examination of the prevalence and quality of home-based child care, with a focus on programs and initiatives to improve the quality and outcomes of children who attend

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Supporting quality in home-based child care: Initiative design and evaluation options
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 30, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A discussion of strategies for the implementation and evaluation of programs and initiatives that support home-based child care

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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