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Current Filters: Author:Paulsell, Diane [remove]; Pub Year:2009 [remove];

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The Atlantic Philanthropies' Disadvantaged Children and Youth program in Ireland and Northern Ireland: Overview of program evaluation findings: Final report
Paulsell, Diane, January 30, 2009
New York: Atlantic Philanthropies.

An evaluation of Disadvantaged Children and Youth, a program in Ireland and Northern Ireland to improve the lives of disadvantaged children by improving service delivery through evidence-based services and prevention and early intervention strategies, based on semistructured interviews with key informants and on a research and policy review

Reports & Papers


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The Atlantic Philanthropies' Disadvantaged Children and Youth program in Ireland and Northern Ireland: Overview of program evaluation findings: Final report [Executive summary]
Paulsell, Diane, January 30, 2009
New York: Atlantic Philanthropies.

A summary of an evaluation of Disadvantaged Children and Youth, a program in Ireland and Northern Ireland to improve the lives of disadvantaged children by improving service delivery through evidence-based services and prevention and early intervention strategies, based on semistructured interviews with key informants and on a research and policy review

Executive Summary


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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Evaluating systems change efforts to support evidence-based home visiting: Concepts and methods
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 01 September, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grants with other funding sources to support the implementation of EBHV programs with fidelity, the scaling up of these high-fidelity home visiting models, and the sustainability of the models. Grantees must also conduct local implementation, outcome, and economic evaluations. CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to conduct a participatory and utilization-focused cross-site evaluation of the grantees? initiatives over the next six years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The MPR-Chapin Hall (MPR-CH) cross-site evaluation will focus on four domains: fidelity, costs, systems, and family and child outcomes. The systems domain evaluation relies on system-based evaluation concepts and methods, articulating a theory of infrastructure change that incorporates key system attributes. This memo provides a literature review for the systems domain evaluation. This literature review is not an exhaustive review of complex systems theory or of the EBHV implementation, scale-up, and sustainability literature. Instead, it focuses on three aspects of the systems domain evaluation: (1) the system-based evaluation approach and theory of change, (2) core EBHV infrastructure concepts, and (3) system-based evaluation methods. (author abstract)

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Home Visit Rating Scales-Adapted
Roggman, Lori A., 2009
Unpublished instrument

Instruments


Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Overview of the cross-site evaluation
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

An overview of the cross-site evaluation design and program models of 17 grantees participating in the implementation of evidence-based home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment

Other


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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