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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Data collection instruments for the evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment cross-site evaluation
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, April, 2012
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. CB/ACF funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to conduct a participatory- and utilization-focused cross-site evaluation of the grantees' EBHV programs. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The design for the EBHV cross-site evaluation is described in a design report published in 2009 (Koball et. al). This document is a companion piece to that design report. It provides data collection instruments used in the evaluation during 2010 and 2011. Protocols for site visits conducted in 2010 are in Section I. Instruments used to collect data on system change and infrastructure building appear in Section II. Section III contains instruments developed to collect data on model fidelity. The time use survey administered as part of the cost study is in Section IV. Finally, Section V contains protocols for site visits conducted in 2012. (author abstract)

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Design options for the assessment of Head Start quality enhancements: Final report. Volume I
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 2005
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A study of quality enhancement and assessment designs for Head Start programs

Other


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Developing initiatives for home-based child care: Current research and future directions
Porter, Toni, May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 4-13

Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality initiatives for this type of child care. This article summarizes key findings on the prevalence and quality of home-based child care, caregiver characteristics, and quality initiatives and then makes recommendations for future directions. (author abstract)

Literature Review


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Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project
United States. Administration for Children and Families,
Education Resources Information Center

This project involves both a cross-site national study and local longitudinal studies of low-income families with young children in Early Head Start sites in 17 communities in the United States. The project was funded in two waves: Birth to Three (1996-2001) and Pre-Kindergarten Follow-Up (2001-2004). The five major components of the project are: an implementation study, an impact evaluation, local research studies, policy studies, and efforts toward continuous program improvement. The implementation study assessed the level and quality of implementation of EHS at each site, as well as variations across sites, with regard to five program areas: child development and health care; family partnerships; community involvement and partnerships; staff development; and program management. Results include a profile of each of the 17 research programs, their services and expected outcomes. The information gathered was critical for the development of the impact evaluation analyses and the identification of pathways to full implementation. The impact evaluation followed a random assignment, longitudinal design to examine how child, parent and family outcomes were influenced by EHS programs, as well as by variations in program approaches and community contexts, program implementation and services, and the characteristics of children and their families. The third component involves 16 local research projects conducted by 15 university-based researchers who partnered with Early Head Start research programs. Designed to investigate the unique outcomes and program functions of each Early Head Start program, these longitudinal studies continue through the second phase of the project, Pre-Kindergarten Follow-up (2001-2004). The policy studies component focuses on issues related to welfare reform, health and disabilities, child-care and fatherhood. The component of continuous program improvement consists of reports and presentations disseminating new information that can help all Early Head Start programs to increase their ability to meet the needs of families.

Major Research Projects


The economic rationale for investing in children: A focus on child care
Paulsell, Diane, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A summary of proceedings from a conference on “The Economic Rationale for Investing in Children: A Focus on Child Care”

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The effectiveness of Early Head Start for 3-year-old children and their parents: Lessons for policy and programs
Love, John M., 2005
Developmental Psychology, 41(6), 885-901

A summary of the evaluated impacts of Early Head Start on child and parent outcomes near the end of program participation

Reports & Papers


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The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers: Appendixes
Paulsell, Diane, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A supplement to the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project report containing details on the agencies studied and protocols used

Other


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The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers: Final interim report
Paulsell, Diane, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A preliminary descriptive evaluation of the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project, analyzing participant characteristics and program design as they affect the extension of home visitation services to relatives and non-relatives caring for infants and toddlers enrolled in home-based Early Head Start programs

Reports & Papers


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The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers: Final interim report [Executive Summary]
Paulsell, Diane, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of a preliminary descriptive evaluation of the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project, examining participant characteristics and program design as they affect the extension of home visitation services to relatives and non-relatives caring for infants and toddlers enrolled in home-based Early Head Start programs

Executive Summary


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Evaluating implementation of quality rating and improvement systems
Paulsell, Diane, 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 269-293). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of early care and education quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS), and an application of implementation science and systems theory to QRIS design, monitoring, and implementation

Other


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Evaluating infrastructure development in complex home visiting systems
Hargreaves, Margaret B., June, 2013
American Journal of Evaluation, 34(2), 147-169

In recent years, increased focus on the effectiveness and accountability of prevention and intervention programs has led to greater government funding for the implementation and spread of evidence-based health and human service delivery models. In particular, attention has been paid to programs that require significant infrastructure investment and systems change to support large scale replication. For conceptual and methodological reasons, such systems change initiatives can be a challenge to evaluate. To overcome these challenges, this article outlines a mixed methods approach to systems change evaluation and offers a case study of how this approach has been used to evaluate the development of system infrastructure supporting the implementation, spread, and sustainability of evidence-based home visiting projects. The approach combined systems concepts (boundaries, relationships, perspectives, ecological levels, and dynamics) and qualitative methods (project site visits, telephone interviews, reviews of project documents and logic models) with quantitative methods (a web-based partner survey) to directly measure the projects' system properties and contextual dynamics, and to assess how these factors were associated with the projects' infrastructure development. In the case study, the projects worked at four ecological levels (organization, community, state, and national) to build eight types of infrastructure (planning, collaboration, operations, workforce development, fiscal capacity, community and political support, communications, and evaluation). The evaluation found that the size of the projects' partner networks was not as important as the quality of their collaboration or their sharing of common goals in the projects' infrastructure development. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Evaluating systems change efforts to support evidence-based home visiting: Concepts and methods
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 01 September, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grants with other funding sources to support the implementation of EBHV programs with fidelity, the scaling up of these high-fidelity home visiting models, and the sustainability of the models. Grantees must also conduct local implementation, outcome, and economic evaluations. CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to conduct a participatory and utilization-focused cross-site evaluation of the grantees? initiatives over the next six years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The MPR-Chapin Hall (MPR-CH) cross-site evaluation will focus on four domains: fidelity, costs, systems, and family and child outcomes. The systems domain evaluation relies on system-based evaluation concepts and methods, articulating a theory of infrastructure change that incorporates key system attributes. This memo provides a literature review for the systems domain evaluation. This literature review is not an exhaustive review of complex systems theory or of the EBHV implementation, scale-up, and sustainability literature. Instead, it focuses on three aspects of the systems domain evaluation: (1) the system-based evaluation approach and theory of change, (2) core EBHV infrastructure concepts, and (3) system-based evaluation methods. (author abstract)

Other


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Evidence-based home visiting systems evaluation update: Infrastructure-building plans and activities in 2011
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 07 December, 2012
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

This report provides a snapshot of subcontractors' plans for achieving their targeted outcomes and the EBHV goals and their actual infrastructure-building activities in year 3 of the initiative, roughly at the midpoint of implementation. EBHV subcontractors are operating in complex, dynamic, and unpredictable environments. As they adapt to these changing conditions, their plans and activities change, potentially altering the initiative's outcomes. Tracking these changing conditions and the evolution of subcontractors' plans and activities as they adapt can provide a rich picture of how complex system interventions operate over time and provide lessons and guidance for how to build infrastructure capacity that supports implementation with fidelity, scale-up, and sustainability of EBHV programs. This brief snapshot adds to earlier work by the cross-site evaluation team that documented subcontractor plans at the end of a one-year planning period and infrastructure-building activities during the planning and early implementation period. The report addresses two main research questions at approximately the midpoint of the funding period: 1. What EBHV initiative goals did subcontractors expect to achieve, and how did they plan to do so? What people and institutions did they expect to engage at each infrastructure level? What infrastructure-building strategies did they expect to implement? What infrastructure-building short-term results and long-term outcomes did they expect to achieve? 2. In what types of infrastructure-building activities did subcontractors actually engage? How were subcontractors' activities influenced by economic and other contextual factors? How did infrastructure-building activities change over time? What were subcontractors' perceived successes in progressing toward their targeted infrastructure-building outcomes and the EBHV goals? What challenges and barriers impeded subcontractors' progress toward their targeted infrastructure-building outcomes and the EBHV goals? (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Family-sensitive caregiving: A key component of quality in early care and education arrangements
Bromer, Juliet, 2011
In M. Zaslow, I. Martinez-Beck, K. Tout, & T. Halle (Eds.), Quality measurement in early childhood settings (pp. 161-190). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A presentation of a model for the assessment of early childhood education and care providers' attitudes towards, knowledge about, and practices with families with young children

Reports & Papers


A guide to emerging strategies for promoting prevention and improving oral health care delivery in Head Start: Lessons from the Oral Health Initiative evaluation: Vol II. Final report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, June 25, 2008
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Emerging strategies and lessons learned from final findings of a two-year implementation evaluation of the Head Start Oral Health Initiative, which provided grants to Head Start programs to design and implement oral health promotion strategies, based on interviews with program directors, a web-based record-keeping system for grantees, and site visits

Other


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Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 15 November, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A summary of a review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5

Executive Summary


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Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 15 October, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A summary of a review of research on the effectiveness of home visiting programs for pregnant women or families with children from birth to age 5

Executive Summary


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Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness review: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, September, 2013
(OPRE Report No. 2013-42). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act established a Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) that provides $1.5 billion over five years to states to establish home visiting program models for at-risk pregnant women and children from birth to age 5. The Act stipulates that 75 percent of the funds must be used for home visiting programs with evidence of effectiveness based on rigorous evaluation research. The HomVEE review provides information about which home visiting program models have evidence of effectiveness as required by the legislation and defined by DHHS, as well as detailed information about the samples of families who participated in the research, the outcomes measured in each study, and the implementation guidelines for each model. This executive summary provides an overview of the HomVEE review process, a summary of the review results, and a link to the HomVEE website for more detailed information. (author abstract)

Executive Summary


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Home Visit Rating Scales-Adapted
Roggman, Lori A., 2009
Unpublished instrument

Instruments


Home Visit Rating Scales-Adapted & Extended
Roggman, Lori A., 2010
Unpublished instrument.

Instruments


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Implementation of the Head Start National Reporting System: Spring 2005 update: Executive summary
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 10 January, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A summary of a study providing updated findings from the Head Start Quality Assurance Study, which examined Head Start staff fidelity to protocol in administering the National Reporting System Child Assessment, based on site visits to Head Start programs

Executive Summary


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Implementation of the National Reporting System in Migrant/Seasonal Head Start programs: Year two update: Final report
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, November, 2007
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A study providing findings for Migrant/Seasonal Head Start programs in the second year of the Head Start Quality Assurance Study, which examined Head Start programs' experiences implementing the Head Start National Reporting System (NRS), including: the quality of their administration of the NRS Child Assessment; their approaches to training staff to conduct the NRS Child Assessment; their use of NRS results for program improvement; and program staff perspectives of the NRS, all based on site visits to a sample of eight Migrant/Seasonal Head Start programs

Reports & Papers


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Kansas and Missouri Early Head Start programs: Kansas City, Kansas, and Sedalia, Missouri
Paulsell, Diane, 2003
Zero to Three, 23(4), 17-26

These case studies provide detailed descriptions of two Early Head Start programs: Project EAGLE, in an urban Kansas community, and the Children's Therapy Center, in a rural Missouri community. Features described include the child care partner recruitment process, partnership agreements, community initiatives supporting those partnerships, technical assistance training, and Child Development Associate (CDA) programs. Partnership successes are identified, such as increased child care access for low-income families and improved support for children with special needs. Challenges are reported in the areas of: quality improvement; coordination of funding streams; communication between families and staff; high teacher turnover rate; additional teacher duties required by the partnerships; and meeting the CDA requirement.

Reports & Papers


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Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs: Executive summary: Volumes I, II, III
United States. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, December 2000
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth and Families.

A summary of a three-volume report on the implementation of the 17 programs participating in the National Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, including overviews of cross-site features, program profiles, and program implementation

Executive Summary


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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