Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections
* Peer Reviewed Journal

15 results found.

Select Citation
Result
Resource Type
*
1.

Child care decision making: Understanding priorities and processes used by low-income families in Minnesota
Forry, Nicole D.; Isner, Tabitha K.; Tout, Kathryn; et al., October, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(7), 995-1015

Few studies have described parents' child care decision-making process, yet understanding how parents make child care choices is fundamental to developing effective services to promote the selection of high-quality care. This study used latent profile analysis to distinguish subgroups of low-income parents identified as having commonalities in the number of options, duration, and sources of information sought as part of their child care decision-making process. Study participants included 260 parents who participated in the baseline wave of the Minnesota Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal phone survey of welfare applicants. Two subgroups of parents were identified. The majority of parents (82%) made choices within 2 weeks and considered on average 2 arrangements. Fewer than half of these parents considered information from experts, public lists, or family members/friends when making a child care choice. The remaining 18% of the sample took on average 11 weeks to make a child care choice, considered on average 3 options, and relied more heavily on information from experts and family members/friends. Practice or Policy: Findings from this study have implications for the marketing of resource and referral counseling services, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems, and consumer education aimed at facilitating the selection of high-quality care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

2.

Child care subsidy literature review
Forry, Nicole D.; Howarth, Grace; Daneri, Paula; et al., December, 2013
(OPRE Brief 2013-60). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The purpose of this review is to summarize recent research on topics related to child care subsidies. It is intended to provide a foundation of empirical knowledge for state administrators, program developers, and policymakers as they choose among and implement subsidy policies. This review reflects current and seminal work completed by researchers in the U.S. and includes published journal articles, dissertations, and reports from studies funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation and other government agencies. The structure and content were selected to reflect topics of interest to child care subsidy state administrators. (author abstract)

Literature Review

get fulltext

3.

Child care subsidy literature review [Executive summary]
Forry, Nicole D.; Howarth, Grace; Daneri, Paula; et al., December, 2013
(OPRE Brief 2013-60). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The purpose of this review is to summarize recent research on topics related to child care subsidies. It is intended to provide a foundation of empirical knowledge for state administrators, program developers, and policymakers as they choose among and implement subsidy policies. This review reflects current and seminal work completed by researchers in the U.S. and includes published journal articles, dissertations, and reports from studies funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation and other government agencies. The structure and content were selected to reflect topics of interest to child care subsidy state administrators. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

4.

Conceptualizing and measuring collaboration in the context of early childhood care and education
Chien, Nina C.; Zaslow, Martha; Fisher, Kelly; et al., August, 2013
(Research Brief OPRE 2013-29). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Despite the fact that many early childhood initiatives depend on the collaboration of multiple organizations and stakeholders, little is known about what makes for successful collaboration within the field of early care and education. In May of 2010, a working meeting was convened by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation to begin to address this issue. This brief builds on work that began during that meeting and extended in the years that followed, particularly work identifying the key components of collaborations and developing a logic model for measuring collaboration in an early childhood context. The first section of this brief presents the logic model, explains its core components, and highlights these components by mapping them onto a hypothetical example of collaboration in early care and education. The next section of the brief shares the results from an extensive review of existing measures of collaboration. Thirty-two measures were found. The last section of the brief describes key measurement considerations and offers some discussion of future directions for collaboration research in the field of early care and education. (author abstract)

Other

get fulltext

5.

Early childhood developmental screening: A compendium of measures for children ages birth to five
Moodie, Shannon; Green, Katie; LaMonte, Lauren; et al., February, 2014
(OPRE Report 2014-11). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This document has several purposes. First, the compendium aims to discuss the purpose of developmental screening and how it differs from child assessment. Second, the compendium aims to "translate" technical psychometric information about the reliability and validity of commonly-used developmental screening tools into language that is easily understood by early childhood practitioners. Being able to access this information more easily can help early childhood practitioners evaluate whether a developmental screening tool is appropriate for the population with which it will be used. Finally, this compendium aims to highlight areas in which the early childhood field is lacking information on reliability and validity of available developmental screening tools. (author abstract)

Methods

get fulltext

6.

Family-provider relationship quality: Review of conceptual and empirical literature of family-provider relationships
Forry, Nicole D.; Bromer, Juliet; Daneri, Paula; et al., November, 2012
(OPRE Report No. 2012-46). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A review of literature that conceptualizes relationships between families and early care and education providers and that identifies factors associated with high-quality family-provider relationships

Other

get fulltext

7.

Maryland Child Care Choices study: Child care expenses and financial support for child care among applicants for Temporary Cash Assistance
Blasberg, Amy; Tout, Kathryn; Daneri, Paula; et al., July, 2013
(Publication No. 2013-29). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

Findings from a longitudinal study of the child care decision-making processes of low income families in Maryland that examine child care expenses and financial assistance, based on a survey of parents applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) with at least one child 6 or younger

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

*
8.

Predictors of quality and child outcomes in family child care settings
Forry, Nicole D.; Torquati, Julia C.; Iruka, Iheoma U.; et al., Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(3), 893-904

Few studies have examined correlates of quality ratings in family child care arrangements. This study analyzes data from a multi-state sample of family child care providers actively seeking professional development for two purposes. First, we examine predictors of observed quality ratings focusing on characteristics of child care providers, the most proximal influences of quality in family child care. Second, we explore associations between three targets of professional development (providers' attitudes, beliefs, and practices) and the pre-academic and social-emotional skills of preschool-aged children. Provider characteristics indicative of personal and professional resources and stress, as well as providers' professional attitudes and beliefs, are predictive of observed quality measures. Observed quality and providers' child-entered beliefs and perceptions of job demands are related to children's developmental outcomes. Implications for future research, policies, and practices are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

*
9.

Quality thresholds, features, and dosage in early care and education: Introduction and literature review
Zaslow, Martha; Green, Katie; Martinez-Beck, Ivelisse; et al., June, 2016
Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 81(2), 7-26

This monograph addresses the hypotheses that preschool children benefit most strongly when early care and education (ECE) is at or above a threshold of quality, has specific quality features, and/or is of longer duration. These issues are pivotal in recent policies designed to improve the quality of ECE, especially for children from low-income families. Evidence of quality thresholds in which ECE quality has stronger impacts in settings with moderate to high levels of quality than in settings with low quality would inform policy initiatives in which monetary incentives or consequences are allocated to ECE settings based on their level of quality. Evidence that specific features of quality, such as quality of teacher-child interactions and of literacy and mathematics instruction, are predictors of gains in child outcomes could help inform quality improvement efforts. Evidence that more time spent in center-based ECE or in instruction in specific content areas predict larger gains among preschoolers could be useful in designing public preschool programs such as Head Start or prekindergarten. Secondary data analyses of eight large studies of preschool children in center-based ECE were conducted. Analyses focused on quality thresholds and quality features examined the extent to which three types of quality measures predicted gains in children's language, literacy, mathematics, and social skills. The measures comprised (1) global quality measures that provide an overall or global rating of quality, focusing on interactions as well as on physical features of the environment, activities, and routines; (2) interaction-specific measures that focus in depth on the quality of interactions between teachers and children with respect to instructional and emotional support; and (3) domain-specific measures that focus on the quality of instruction and stimulation in specific content areas such as early language and literacy. The goal was to provide replicated analyses with data from several projects in order to address each question. Multilevel analyses that controlled for entry skills were conducted, and results were combined by using meta-analysis, nonlinear and nonparametric analyses, and propensity score analyses. (author abstract)

Other

*
10.

The social-emotional development of dual language learners: Looking back at existing research and moving forward with purpose
Halle, Tamara; Zepeda, Marlene; Whittaker, Jessica E. Vick; et al., Q4 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 29(4), 734-749

This review describes the state of existing knowledge with regard to dual language learners' (DLLs) social-emotional development birth to age 5. The review focuses on several widely recognized dimensions of children's social-emotional development: self-regulation, social competence, social cognition, and problem behaviors. We begin by presenting a theoretical perspective that frames our understanding of the interplay between relational and contextual factors that contribute to the social-emotional well-being of DLLs. A targeted search of the literature identified 14 peer-reviewed studies published from 2000 to 2011 that examined social-emotional outcomes for young DLLs in family, school, and peer contexts. Results suggest that DLLs have at least equal (if not better) social-emotional outcomes compared to native English speakers. There is also some evidence that the use of the home language in early childhood classrooms can be a positive, moderating factor for DLLs' social-emotional development. Contextual and individual characteristics are highly correlated with DLL status, making it difficult to develop clear conclusions about the unique influence of DLL status on social-emotional outcomes. We conclude by identifying avenues for future inquiry. (author abstract)

Literature Review

get fulltext

11.

Subsidy continuity in Maryland
Forry, Nicole D.; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Krafft, Caroline; et al., November, 2012
(Publication No. 2012-43). Washington, DC: Child Trends.

A study of the duration of children's continuous participation in the child care subsidy program in Maryland, as well as factors associated with the duration, based on child care subsidy voucher administrative data from June 2007 through September 2010

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

12.

Supporting continuity through Child Care and Development Fund subsidies: A review of select state policies
Forry, Nicole D.; Durham, Christin; Daneri, Paula; et al., March, 2014
(OPRE Research Brief No. 2014-32). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This brief was co-authored by researchers at Child Trends and the Urban Institute and uses data from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database to highlight similarities and differences in states on select subsidy policies that may be related to the continuity of subsidy receipt and/or the continuity of subsidized arrangements among eligible families. State-level data extracted as of October 1, 2012, from the CCDF Policies Database were used to develop maps and tables that can be used to compare and contrast states on three key policies: eligibility redetermination periods and policies related to changes in eligibility, tiered income eligibility, and what allowances states make for job search activities at initial application and redetermination. Information provided in this brief may be used to contextualize research findings across states and to inform conversations about facilitating continuity in subsidized care among state administrators. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

13.

Supporting continuity through Child Care and Development Fund subsidies: A review of select state policies [Executive summary]
Forry, Nicole D.; Durham, Christin; Daneri, Paula; et al., March, 2014
(OPRE Research Brief No. 2014-32). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This brief was co-authored by researchers at Child Trends and the Urban Institute and uses data from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database to highlight similarities and differences in states on select subsidy policies that may be related to the continuity of subsidy receipt and/or the continuity of subsidized arrangements among eligible families. State-level data extracted as of October 1, 2012, from the CCDF Policies Database were used to develop maps and tables that can be used to compare and contrast states on three key policies: eligibility redetermination periods and policies related to changes in eligibility, tiered income eligibility, and what allowances states make for job search activities at initial application and redetermination. Information provided in this brief may be used to contextualize research findings across states and to inform conversations about facilitating continuity in subsidized care among state administrators. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

14.

What works for reducing problem behaviors in early childhood: Lessons from experimental evaluations
Carney, Rachel; Rojas, Angela; Stratford, Brandon; et al., August, 2015
(Publication #2015-32). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

This research brief synthesizes experimental evaluations of 50 programs. The evaluations assessed program impacts on externalizing behaviors and/or internalizing behaviors among children ages birth to five. Evaluations of twenty-six programs assessed externalizing behaviors exclusively; 23 program evaluations assessed both externalizing and internalizing behaviors; and one assessed internalizing behaviors exclusively. Most of the evaluations focused on preschool children, or those ages three to five. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

15.

Work patterns among TANF applicants: Results from a Maryland survey of families with young children
Daneri, Paula; Forry, Nicole D.; Blasberg, Amy; et al., July, 2013
Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

Findings from a survey of 289 parents who had applied for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in Maryland that examine their work hours and schedule in the week prior to the survey

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

Select Citation

Search Feedback