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Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement, 1997
Hofferth, Sandra L., 2000
In Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement, 1997. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

A supplement to a longitudinal survey started in 1968 with information on topics such as school progress, academic achievement and cognitive ability, social well-being, emotional well-being, and health.

Data Sets


Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement, 2002
Hofferth, Sandra L., 2006
Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement, 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

A supplement to a longitudinal survey started in 1968 with information on topics such as school progress, academic achievement and cognitive ability, social well-being, emotional well-being, and health.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Antonucci Map, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, June, 2013
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): ANTONUCCI MAP, WAVE 3, 2000-2002. ICPSR13674-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-05. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13674.v1

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Antonucci Map. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 3, 6, 9, and 12 and provided information regarding the subject's close friendships.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13610-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-04-17. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13610

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale. It obtained an interviewer rating of the behavior of all subjects in Cohorts 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. It recorded the amount of time the interviewer spent observing the subject and whether this observation took place only during the interview with the subject or during the interview and at other times. The subject was also rated on various behaviors.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13678-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13678

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale. It obtained an interviewer rating of the behavior of all subjects in Cohorts 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12. It recorded the amount of time the interviewer spent observing the subject and whether this observation took place only during the interview with the subject or during the interview and at other times. The subject was also rated on various behaviors. This data collection is closely related to PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13610).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Behavior Checklist, Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005.

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Behavior Checklist, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13611-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-03-17.

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One of the measures that composed the Longitudinal Cohort Study was the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The CBCL protocol, administered to parents or primary caregivers, was first developed by Thomas M. Achenbach and has been one of the most widely-used standardized measures in child psychology for evaluating maladaptive behavioral and emotional problems in preschool subjects aged 2 to 3 or in subjects between the ages of 4 and 18.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Behavior Checklist, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13679-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-10-11. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13679

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One of the measures that composed the Longitudinal Cohort Study was the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The CBCL protocol, administered to parents or primary caregivers, was first developed by Thomas M. Achenbach and has been one of the most widely-used standardized measures in child psychology for evaluating maladaptive behavioral and emotional problems in preschool subjects aged 2 to 3 or in subjects between the ages of 4 and 18.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Care Interview, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Care Interview, Wave 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13680-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13680

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Child Care Interview. It was administered to subjects' primary caregivers (PCs) in Cohort 0. It included questions on the structure of child care arrangements, the flexibility and stability of this arrangement, and other questions related to child care. It also asked some questions similar in nature to those asked in PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SCHOOL AND DAY CARE SCREEN, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13653).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Children and First Pregnancy, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILDREN AND FIRST PREGNANCY, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13683-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13683

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Children and First Pregnancy instrument. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 15 and 18 and collected information related to the number of children the subject had, as well as information regarding the subject's first pregnancy.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Conflict Tactics for Parent and Child, Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONFLICT TACTICS FOR PARENT AND CHILD, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. ICPSR13584-v2. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-09-27. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13584.v2

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Conflict Tactics Scale for Partner and Spouse, Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONFLICT TACTICS SCALE FOR PARTNER AND SPOUSE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. ICPSR13583-v2. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-09-27. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13583.v2

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Consequences of Substance Use, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONSEQUENCES OF SUBSTANCE USE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13687-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13687

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Consequences of Substance Use interview. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 9, 12, 15, and 18 and obtained information related to outcomes of the subject being caught, by school officials, police, or their parents, using alcohol or drugs. Subjects in Cohorts 15 and 18 were asked questions from a slightly different instrument than subjects in Cohorts 9 and 12. Cohorts 15 and 18 were asked more detailed questions regarding what substances and what quantity subjects were caught with.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Demographic File, Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEMOGRAPHIC FILE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005.

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Demographic File, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEMOGRAPHIC FILE, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13609-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-09-13. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13609

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Demographic File, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEMOGRAPHIC FILE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13669-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-10-11. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13669

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Depression, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEPRESSION, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13614-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-11-14.

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The Depression survey was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 0 to 15. The instrument was adapted from the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI) and obtained information about depressive symptoms experienced by the primary caregiver during the past year.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Depression, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEPRESSION, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13691-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13691

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The Depression survey was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 0 to 15. The instrument was adapted from the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI) and obtained information about depressive symptoms experienced by the primary caregiver during the past year.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Deviance of Peers, Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEVIANCE OF PEERS, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. ICPSR13585-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13585.v1

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Deviance of Peers, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEVIANCE OF PEERS, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13615-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-03-17.

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. It was designed to advance the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors. In particular, the project examined the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence. At the same time, the project provided a detailed look at the environments in which these social behaviors took place by collecting substantial amounts of data about urban Chicago, including its people, institutions, and resources. The data in this collection are from Wave 2 of the Longitudinal Cohort Study, administered between 1997 and 2000. The data files contain information from the Deviance of Peers protocol. The Deviance of Peers instrument was a self-report interview that obtained information about peer involvement in conventional and delinquent activities.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Deviance of Peers, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEVIANCE OF PEERS, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13693-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13693

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. It was designed to advance the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors. In particular, the project examined the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence. At the same time, the project provided a detailed look at the environments in which these social behaviors took place by collecting substantial amounts of data about urban Chicago, including its people, institutions, and resources. The data in this collection are from Wave 2 of the Longitudinal Cohort Study, administered between 1997 and 2000. The data files contain information from the Deviance of Peers protocol. The Deviance of Peers instrument was a self-report interview that obtained information about peer involvement in conventional and delinquent activities.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Dysthymia, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DYSTHYMIA, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13616-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-11-22.

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The Dysthymia survey was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 0 to 15. The instrument was adapted from the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI) and obtained information about depressive symptoms experienced by the primary caregiver during the past two years.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity Temperament Survey, Wave 1, 1994-1995
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity Temperament Survey, Wave 1, 1994-1995 [Computer file]. ICPSR13586-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-08. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13586.v1

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Employment and Income Interview, Wave 1, 1994-1995
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): EMPLOYMENT AND INCOME INTERVIEW, WAVE 1, 1994-1995 [Computer file]. ICPSR13587-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-08.

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Exposure to Violence (Primary Caregiver), Wave 1, 1994-1997
Earls, Felton, 2005
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE (PRIMARY CAREGIVER), WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [Computer file]. ICPSR13588-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-22.

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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