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Current Filters: Author:Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne [remove]; State:ILLINOIS [remove];

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Does the neighborhood context alter the link between youth's after-school time activities and developmental outcomes? A multilevel analysis
Fauth, Rebecca, May, 2007
Developmental Psychology, 43(3), 760-777

A longitudinal analysis of the links between neighborhood characteristics and participation in after school activities, and anxiety/depression, delinquency, and substance use among a sample of 9- and 12-year-old youths, using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN)

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Effects of welfare reform on teenage parents and their children
Aber, J. Lawrence, 1995
The Future of Children, 5(2), 53-71

An examination of the public policy context in which the Teenage Parent Welfare Demonstration project was designed and implemented

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Head Start, prekindergarten, and academic school readiness: A comparison among regions in the United States
Zhai, Fuhua, May, 2013
Journal of Social Service Research, 39(3), 345-364

Child care programs (including Head Start, prekindergarten [pre-K], and other center-based care) can differ, with patterns of use based on their location. Yet little research has examined how Head Start and pre-K programs affect children's academic school readiness, including vocabulary and reading skills at school entry, in the South as compared to other regions. To examine this further, secondary data (n=2,803) collected in the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study were examined. Overall findings suggest, regardless of region, that Head Start and pre-K participants had higher academic skills at school entry than did their counterparts. In addition, when Head Start was compared to other center-based care and pre-K was compared to other care arrangements, both had larger effects on improving academic skills in the South compared with in other regions. These findings imply that Head Start and pre-K programs should target children who otherwise would receive nonparental non-center-based care. Future research should focus on why the effects of Head Start and pre-K vary between the South and other regions. (author abstract)

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The homelife interview from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods: Assessment of parenting and home environment for 3- to 15-year-olds
Leventhal, Tama, 2004
Parenting: Science and Practice, 4(2-3), 211-241

A description of the development of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods Homelife Interview using aspects of the Home Observation for the Measurement of the Environment inventory

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The impact of child care subsidy use on child care quality
Ryan, Rebecca, Q3 2011
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 26(3), 320-331

In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF),now the government's largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the quality of care families purchase. This study investigates the impact of government subsidization on parents' selection of child care quality using multivariate regression and propensity score matching approaches to account for differential selection into subsidy receipt and care arrangements. Data were drawn from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (CCS-FFCWS), conducted in 2002 and 2003 in 14 of the 20 FFCWS cities when focal children were 3 years old (N= 456). Our results indicate that families who used subsidies chose higher quality care than comparable mothers who did not use subsidies, but only because subsidy recipients were more likely to use center-based care. Subgroup analyses revealed that families using subsidies purchased higher-quality home-based care but lower-quality center-based care than comparable non-recipients. Findings suggest that child care subsidies may serve as more than a work support for low-income families by enhancing the quality of nonmaternal care children experience but that this effect is largely attributable to recipients' using formal child care arrangements (versus kith and kin care) more often than non-recipients. (author abstract)

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A multilevel analysis of the links between youth's after-school time activities and their well-being
Fauth, Rebecca,
New York: Columbia University, National Center for Children and Families.

Many questions remain about how various types of participation (i.e., specific activities, duration) or participation for diverse youth relate to youth development. In this study we address both these issues by investigating how participation in specific activities over time influences adolescents' well-being and how the impact of participation varies for youth living in different neighborhoods. (author abstract)

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Neighborhood characteristics and child care type and quality
Burchinal, Margaret, September 2008
Early Education and Development, 19(5), 702-725

A study of the association between the social and demographic characteristics of neighborhoods and neighborhood-level child care choice and quality, based on a sample of 80 Chicago neighborhoods

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Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): My Exposure to Violence (Subject), Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2006
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MY EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE (SUBJECT), WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13617-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-12-06.

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. Once such measure was the subject self-report version of the Exposure to Violence. For Wave 2, a much more detailed version of the instrument than was used in Wave 1 was developed to assess exposure to violence. It was called, My Exposure to Violence (Subject), or ETVS. This detailed subject self-report instrument was administered to Cohorts 9 to 15 and obtained information regarding the subject's lifetime and past year exposure to violent events. In addition, a short form of the subject self-report instrument was used with subjects in Cohort 6. The subject self-report instrument is complemented by the parent-report instrument PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MY CHILD'S EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13619).

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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