Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: Author:Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne [remove]; New in last year [remove];

9 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

*

Approaches to learning and Hispanic children's math scores: The moderating role of English proficiency
Bumgarner, Erin, May, 2013
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 35(2), 241-259

Accumulating evidence suggests that children's approaches to learning (ATL) at kindergarten entry predict their academic achievement years later. However, the gains associated with ATL may be diminished for Hispanic immigrant children, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). We tested whether ATL predicted math scores in a sample of first- and second generation Hispanic immigrants drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten cohort. We further tested whether English proficiency moderated this association. Separate models by study wave (kindergarten, first grade, and third grade) were run to examine whether associations among English proficiency, ATL, and math changed over time. Results indicated that ATL, measured at the previous wave, predicted math scores in first and third grade, but not kindergarten. Moreover, in third grade, ATL predicted math only for children who were proficient in English. The implications for Hispanic immigrant children are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Early enrichment opportunities: Participation and cognitive benefits in kindergarten
Malone, Lizabeth M.,
New York: Columbia University, National Center for Children and Families.

Children's out-of-school time in elementary school can include after-school programs, informal child care, extracurricular activities, and experiences and activities with family in the home and community. This paper focuses on kindergartners' extracurricular activities and use of community resources and impact of participation on spring achievement. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Head Start and children's nutrition, weight, and health care receipt
Lee, RaeHyuck, Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(4), 723-733

Using a sample of low-income children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (N [is approximately] 4350) and propensity-score weighted regressions, we analyzed children's nutrition, weight, and health care receipt at kindergarten entry, comparing (1) Head Start participants and all non-participants, and (2) Head Start participants and children in prekindergarten, other center-based care, other non-parental care, or only parental care. Overall, we found that compared to all non-participants, Head Start participants were more likely to receive dental checkups but showed no differences in getting medical checkups; they were also more likely to have healthy eating patterns but showed no differences in Body Mass Index (BMI), overweight, or obesity. However, these results varied depending on the comparison group-Head Start participants showed lower BMI scores and lower probability of overweight compared to those in other non-parental care, and the effects on healthy eating and dental checkups differed by comparison group. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Head Start, prekindergarten, and academic school readiness: A comparison among regions in the United States
Zhai, Fuhua, May, 2013
Journal of Social Service Research, 39(3), 345-364

Child care programs (including Head Start, prekindergarten [pre-K], and other center-based care) can differ, with patterns of use based on their location. Yet little research has examined how Head Start and pre-K programs affect children's academic school readiness, including vocabulary and reading skills at school entry, in the South as compared to other regions. To examine this further, secondary data (n=2,803) collected in the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study were examined. Overall findings suggest, regardless of region, that Head Start and pre-K participants had higher academic skills at school entry than did their counterparts. In addition, when Head Start was compared to other center-based care and pre-K was compared to other care arrangements, both had larger effects on improving academic skills in the South compared with in other regions. These findings imply that Head Start and pre-K programs should target children who otherwise would receive nonparental non-center-based care. Future research should focus on why the effects of Head Start and pre-K vary between the South and other regions. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Investing in our future: The evidence base on preschool education
Yoshikawa, Hirokazu, October, 2013
Ann Arbor, MI: Society for Research in Child Development.

A review of research on the relationship of preschool participation to children's developmental outcomes

Other


get fulltext

Investing in our future: The evidence base on preschool education: Executive summary
Yoshikawa, Hirokazu, October, 2013
Ann Arbor, MI: Society for Research in Child Development.

A summary of a review of research on the relationship of preschool participation to children's developmental outcomes

Executive Summary


get fulltext

*

Longitudinal associations among interest, persistence, supportive parenting, and achievement in early childhood
Martin, Anne, Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(4), 658-667

This study investigates two facets of children's school readiness: interest in new cognitive tasks (interest) and persistence in task completion (persistence). Little attention has been paid to the early development of these learning behaviors, although they might prove susceptible to intervention even before school entry. Using data from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, a sample of low-income children (N = 1771) was followed to model bidirectional associations among interest and persistence and maternal supportive parenting between ages 1 and 3, and estimate associations between children's interest and persistence at age 3 and their academic skills at age 5. Results indicate that maternal supportive parenting influences children's interest and persistence more strongly and consistently than interest or persistence influences parenting, and that interest but not persistence transacts with parenting over time. Interest and persistence were equally predictive of children's early academic skills. Findings affirm that both interest and persistence during toddlerhood predict children's academic standing at school entry. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

A multilevel analysis of the links between youth's after-school time activities and their well-being
Fauth, Rebecca,
New York: Columbia University, National Center for Children and Families.

Many questions remain about how various types of participation (i.e., specific activities, duration) or participation for diverse youth relate to youth development. In this study we address both these issues by investigating how participation in specific activities over time influences adolescents' well-being and how the impact of participation varies for youth living in different neighborhoods. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Antonucci Map, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, June, 2013
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): ANTONUCCI MAP, WAVE 3, 2000-2002. ICPSR13674-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-05. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13674.v1

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Antonucci Map. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 3, 6, 9, and 12 and provided information regarding the subject's close friendships.

Data Sets


Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate