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Current Filters: Author:Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne [remove]; Pub Year:2007 [remove];

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Child care quality in different state policy contexts
Rigby, Dawn Elizabeth, Fall 2007
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 26(4), 887-907

Using data from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we test associations between the quality of child care and state child care policies. These data, which include observations of child care and interviews with care providers and mothers for 777 children across 14 states, allow for comparisons across a broader range of policy regimes and care settings than earlier research on this topic. Using multilevel linear and logistic models, we found that more generous subsidy policies (that is, greater investment, higher income eligibility) were positively associated with the quality of care in nonprofit child care centers, as well as with the use of center care. The stringency of regulations (that is, teacher education requirements, teacher-child ratios/thresholds) was also associated with both quality and type of care, but in more complex ways. Higher teacher training requirements were positively associated with the quality of both family child care and nonprofit centers, while more stringent regulations decreased the number of children attending center care. No links were found between state policies and the quality of for-profit center care. The implications for policy makers, advocates, and policy analysts are discussed. (author abstract)

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Does the neighborhood context alter the link between youth's after-school time activities and developmental outcomes? A multilevel analysis
Fauth, Rebecca, May, 2007
Developmental Psychology, 43(3), 760-777

A longitudinal analysis of the links between neighborhood characteristics and participation in after school activities, and anxiety/depression, delinquency, and substance use among a sample of 9- and 12-year-old youths, using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN)

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The joint influence of mother and father parenting on child cognitive outcomes at age 5
Martin, Anne, Q4 2007
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 22(4), 423-439

An assessment of the association between both maternal and paternal supportiveness during toddlerhood and young children’s math and language achievement at age 5 in a sample of 200 low-income two-parent homes participating in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project

Reports & Papers


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Patterns of Child Care Subsidy Use in New York City: Care Arrangements, Parental Preferences, and Subsidy Administration Policies
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, 2007
Columbia University, Teachers College

The goal of this project is to examine associations among parental preferences for child care, parents' perceptions of care quality, subsidy policies, and the care arrangements that low-income working families in New York City use for their young children. The project relies on two data sources: (1) New York City administrative data on the entire population of subsidy recipients with children age 6 and younger to describe families' child care arrangements; and (2) a phone survey with a random sample of 2,250 families drawn from the administrative data file. The survey asks parents about their reasons for selecting each of their care arrangements, their level of satisfaction with the care they use, the dimensions of care that they perceive as most important, their work/family balance, and their experiences with the subsidy administration system. Using these data, the project attends to four sets of research questions: (1) What are the dynamics of subsidy use? What is the duration of subsidy use?; (2) Is there a mismatch between parents' stated preferences for child care, and the care that they actually use? What are the policy barriers that potentially prevent families from accessing the care that they prefer? Are there specific barriers faced by families who receive vouchers (as opposed to those who receive care in a contracted setting) that affect their use of formal care?; (3) Are parental preferences for child care differentially associated with the use of formal versus informal care? How are parental perceptions of child care quality and parental work characteristics associated with the use of formal or informal care?; and (4) Does the continuity of care depend on whether the care is informal or formal?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13678-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13678

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Child and Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale. It obtained an interviewer rating of the behavior of all subjects in Cohorts 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12. It recorded the amount of time the interviewer spent observing the subject and whether this observation took place only during the interview with the subject or during the interview and at other times. The subject was also rated on various behaviors. This data collection is closely related to PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13610).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Care Interview, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Child Care Interview, Wave 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13680-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13680

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Child Care Interview. It was administered to subjects' primary caregivers (PCs) in Cohort 0. It included questions on the structure of child care arrangements, the flexibility and stability of this arrangement, and other questions related to child care. It also asked some questions similar in nature to those asked in PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SCHOOL AND DAY CARE SCREEN, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13653).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Children and First Pregnancy, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILDREN AND FIRST PREGNANCY, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13683-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13683

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Children and First Pregnancy instrument. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 15 and 18 and collected information related to the number of children the subject had, as well as information regarding the subject's first pregnancy.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Consequences of Substance Use, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONSEQUENCES OF SUBSTANCE USE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13687-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13687

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Consequences of Substance Use interview. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 9, 12, 15, and 18 and obtained information related to outcomes of the subject being caught, by school officials, police, or their parents, using alcohol or drugs. Subjects in Cohorts 15 and 18 were asked questions from a slightly different instrument than subjects in Cohorts 9 and 12. Cohorts 15 and 18 were asked more detailed questions regarding what substances and what quantity subjects were caught with.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Depression, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEPRESSION, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13691-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13691

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The Depression survey was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 0 to 15. The instrument was adapted from the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI) and obtained information about depressive symptoms experienced by the primary caregiver during the past year.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Deviance of Peers, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEVIANCE OF PEERS, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13693-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13693

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. It was designed to advance the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors. In particular, the project examined the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence. At the same time, the project provided a detailed look at the environments in which these social behaviors took place by collecting substantial amounts of data about urban Chicago, including its people, institutions, and resources. The data in this collection are from Wave 2 of the Longitudinal Cohort Study, administered between 1997 and 2000. The data files contain information from the Deviance of Peers protocol. The Deviance of Peers instrument was a self-report interview that obtained information about peer involvement in conventional and delinquent activities.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Family Legal Update, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): FAMILY LEGAL UPDATE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13703-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13703

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Family Legal Update administered to the primary caregivers of subjects belonging to Cohorts 0 to 15 and to the subjects, themselves, in Cohort 18. It included questions designed to obtain any family member's involvement with the law since the Wave 1 interview (PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): FAMILY MENTAL HEALTH AND LEGAL HISTORY, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13591]).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Family Legal Update (Young Adult), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): FAMILY LEGAL UPDATE (YOUNG ADULT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13704-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13704

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Family Legal Update administered to the primary caregivers of subjects belonging to Cohorts 0 to 15 and to the subjects, themselves, in Cohort 18. It included questions designed to obtain any family member's involvement with the law since the Wave 1 interview (PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): FAMILY MENTAL HEALTH AND LEGAL HISTORY, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13591]).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Subject and Young Adult), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (SUBJECT AND YOUNG ADULT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13708-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13708

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Subject and Young Adult) instrument. This version of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder instrument was administered to subjects for Cohorts 6, 9, 12, and 15. The instrument was adapted from the Anxiety module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' worrying and anxiety. It is similar to PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (SUBJECT), WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13625) and related to PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (PRIMARY CAREGIVER REPORT ON SUBJECT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 (ICPSR 13706) and PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (PRIMARY CAREGIVER AND YOUNG ADULT REPORT ON SELF), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 (ICPSR 13707). It asked a very similar set of questions as that in 13706 and a slightly different, but similarly themed, set of questions as that in 13707.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Health Screen, Wave 2, 1997-2000
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): HEALTH SCREEN, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR13629-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-03-29. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13629

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Health Screen, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): HEALTH SCREEN, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13715-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-04-02. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13715

A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Household Composition, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13714-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13714

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Household Composition listing, administered to either the primary caregivers of subjects belonging to Cohorts 0 to 15, or to the subjects belonging to Cohort 18. It obtained basic information on the composition of the subject's household and included each household member's age, gender, and relationship to the subject. In Wave 1, this information was incorporated into the Family Structure and Health History (PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): FAMILY STRUCTURE AND HEALTH HISTORY, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13592]).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Major Depressive Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER (PRIMARY CAREGIVER), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13722-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13722

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The primary caregiver version of the Major Depressive Disorder instrument was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 3, 6, and 9. The instrument was adapted from the Depression module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' depression.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Major Depressive Disorder (Subject and Young Adult), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER (SUBJECT AND YOUNG ADULT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13723-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13723

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The primary caregiver version of the Major Depressive Disorder instrument was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 3, 6, and 9. The instrument was adapted from the Depression module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' depression.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): My Child's Exposure to Violence, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MY CHILD'S EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13698-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13698

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the parent-report version of the Exposure to Violence. For Wave 2, a much more detailed version of the instrument than was used in Wave 1 was developed to assess exposure to violence. This detailed parent-report instrument was administered to Cohorts 0 to 15 and obtained information regarding the subject's lifetime and past year exposure to violent events. The parent-report instrument is complemented by the subject self-report instrument, PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MY EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE (SUBJECT), WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13617).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Oppositional Defiance Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Oppositional Defiance Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13726-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13726

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The primary caregiver version of the Oppositional Defiance Disorder instrument was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 3, 6, and 9. The instrument was adapted from the Disruptive Behavior module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' defiant behavior.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Oppositional Defiance Disorder (Subject), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANCE DISORDER (SUBJECT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13727-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13727

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The subject version of the Oppositional Defiance Disorder instrument was administered to subjects for Cohorts 9, 12, and 15. The instrument was adapted from the Disruptive Behavior module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' defiant behavior.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Past Year (Primary Caregiver), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, PAST YEAR (PRIMARY CAREGIVER), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13735-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-03-16. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13735

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The primary caregiver version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Past Year Section) was administered to subjects' primary caregivers for Cohorts 3, 6, and 9. The instrument was adapted from the Anxiety module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' anxiety or stress in relation to traumatic events that may have happened to the subjects in the past year.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Past Year (Subject), Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, PAST YEAR (SUBJECT), WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13736-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-03-16. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13736

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The subject version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Past Year Section) was administered to subjects for Cohorts 9, 12, and 15. The instrument was adapted from the Anxiety module of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC 4) and obtained information regarding subjects' anxiety or stress in relation to traumatic events that may have happened to them in the past year.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): School Interview, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SCHOOL INTERVIEW, WAVE 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13740-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-07. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13740

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the School Interview protocol. This was adapted from the school section of the Youth Interview Schedule used in the Philadelphia Family Management Study. It included sections addressing school climate, school safety, types of classes the subject had taken, the subject's attitude toward school, and participation in activities within and outside of school and in after-school activities. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 6, 9, and 12. It is closely related to PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SCHOOL INTERVIEW, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13654).

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): School Screen, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, 2007
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): School Screen, Wave 3, 2000-2002 [Computer file]. ICPSR13739-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-07. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13739

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. The School Screen obtained information regarding schools attended, involvement in day care and after-school programming, and enrollment in any special programming.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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