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Beyond work-family balance: Are family-friendly organizations more attractive?
Bourhis, Anne, Winter 2010
Industrial Relations, 65(1), 98-117

A study of 4 distinct effects of family friendly practices (FFP) namely, on-site child care, generous personal leaves, flexible scheduling, and telecommuting, as well as candidates' desires for role segmentation and corporate reputation on organizational attractiveness, from 5 scenarios presented to 110 subjects in a Canadian university continuing education management class

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Child care subsidies, welfare reforms, and lone mothers
Cleveland, Gordon, 2003
Industrial Relations, 42(2), 251-69

A study using policy simulations on the employment and child care decisions of single mother families with young children in Canada as they relate to employment incomes, social assistance incomes, and child care costs, based on data from the Canadian National Child Care Survey (CNCCS)

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The value of employer-sponsored child care to employees
Connelly, Rachel, 2004
Industrial Relations, 43(4), 759-792

An estimation of the value that employees place on employer-sponsored child care (ESCC) benefits, using the contingent-valuation method, based on data from interviews with 904 employees from three same-industry firms

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