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Attitudes toward intergenerational exchanges among administrators in child and adult day care centers
Travis, Shirley S., 1997
Educational Gerontology, 23(8), 775-787

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Benefits of intergenerational staffing in preschools
Larkin, Elizabeth, 2001
Educational Gerontology, 27(5), 373-385

A study of the contributions that older adults, who have not been formally trained, had on early childhood educators and programs

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Child and adult day care professions converging in the 1990s?: Implications for training and research
Travis, Shirley S., 1993
Educational Gerontology, 19(4), 283-293

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Grandparents' and parents' views about their family and children's adjustment to kindergarten
Teichman, Yona, 1998
Educational Gerontology, 24(2), 115-128

A study examining how certain characteristics of parents, maternal, and paternal grandparents might affect children's transition to kindergarten

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Innovation in elder and child care: An intergenerational experience
Chamberlain, Valerie M., 1994
Educational Gerontology, 20(2), 193-204

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Intergenerational daycare and preschoolers' attitudes about aging
Middlecamp, Molly Katherine, 2002
Educational Gerontology, 28(4), 271-288

An analytical comparison of attitudes about aging and older adults among 18 preschool children enrolled in an intergenerational child care program versus 15 preschoolers in a non-intergenerational program

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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