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Early education experiences & school-to-work program participation
Caputo, Richard K., 2003
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 30(4), 141-156

An assessment of the relationship between Head Start participation and adolescents' subsequent enrollment in school-to-work (STW) programs, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97)

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Grandfathers and the impact of raising grandchildren
Bullock, Karen, 2005
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 32(1), 43-59

A study of the experiences of 26 grandfathers raising grandchildren in a rural Southeastern community

Reports & Papers


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Head Start, other preschool programs, & life success in a youth cohort
Caputo, Richard K., 2003
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 30(2), 105-128

An assessment of the effects of Head Start and other preschool programs on the economic well-being of a cohort of youth compared to those who had no preschool experience, using data from the 1979 Cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79)

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Improving the quality of child care in the rural South
Griffin, Margaret E., 1998
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 25(1), 121-131

An overview of a plan developed by the Training Resource Center and early childhood professional groups to improve child care in the Upper Cumberland region of Tennessee, implemented over a two year span, supported by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation grant

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Participants' perceptions of the childcare subsidy system
Pearlmutter, Sue, 2003
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 30(4), 157-173

This paper presents a focus group study of perceptions of cash assistance participants in Cuyahoga County, Ohio and the San Fernando Valley in California regarding childcare subsidy use, choices of care, and perceptions of quality. TANF participants discuss experiences in the subsidy system and indicate needs and preferences for childcare. Advocates, policy makers, and parents recognize the need for suitable childcare so that TANF recipients can go to work. However, discussants' comments demonstrate one result of a changing, but not yet changed, social safety net. The authors explore strategies to address participants' concerns--childcare systems that neither function as promised, nor offer quality of care that enhances child development and is safe and comforting for children. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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