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African American preschoolers' language, emergent literacy skills, and use of African American English: A complex relation
Connor, Carol McDonald, August 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49(4), 771-792

An examination of the relation between Head Start African American preschoolers' use of African American English and their language and emergent literacy skills

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Directiveness in teacher's language input to toddlers and preschoolers in day care
Girolametto, Luigi, 2000
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 43(5), 1101-1114

An investigation of the correlation between teacher-child directive interaction and child language development, based on a sample of 20 early childhood teachers and their 80 toddler and preschool students in Toronto, Canada

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The efficacy of a vocabulary intervention for dual-language learners with language impairment
Restrepo, M. Adelaida, April, 2013
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56(2), 748-765

Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the efficacy of a Spanish-English versus English-only vocabulary intervention for dual-language learners (DLLs) with language impairment compared to mathematics intervention groups and typically developing controls with no intervention. Further, in this study the authors also examined whether the language of instruction affected English, Spanish, and conceptual vocabulary differentially. Method: The authors randomly assigned 202 preschool DLLs with language impairment to 1 of 4 conditions: bilingual vocabulary, English-only vocabulary, bilingual mathematics, or English-only mathematics. Fifty-four DLLs with typical development received no intervention. The vocabulary intervention consisted of a 12-week small-group dialogic reading and hands-on vocabulary instruction of 45 words. Postintervention group differences and linear growth rates were examined in conceptual, English, and Spanish receptive and expressive vocabulary for the 45 treatment words. Results: Results indicate that the bilingual vocabulary intervention facilitated receptive and expressive Spanish and conceptual vocabulary gains in DLLs with language impairment compared with the English vocabulary intervention, mathematics intervention, and no-intervention groups. The English-only vocabulary intervention differed significantly from the mathematics condition and no-intervention groups on all measures but did not differ from the bilingual vocabulary intervention. Vocabulary growth rates postintervention slowed considerably. Results support the idea that bilingual interventions support native- and second-language vocabulary development. Conclusion: English-only intervention supports only English. Use of repeated dialogic reading and hands-on activities facilitates vocabulary acquisition. (author abstract)

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Interaction among preschoolers with and without disabilities: Effects of across-the-day peer intervention
Goldstein, Howard, 1997
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 40(1), 33-48

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Phonological awareness and print knowledge of preschool children with cochlear implants
Ambrose, Sophie E., June, 2012
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55(3), 811-823

Purpose: To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. Method: The sample comprised 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36 to 60 months. Children's print knowledge, phonological awareness, language, speech production, and speech perception abilities were assessed. Results: For phonological awareness, the CI group's mean score fell within one standard deviation of the Test of Preschool Early Literacy's (Lonigan, Wagner, Torgesen, & Rashotte, 2007) normative sample mean but was more than one standard deviation below the NH group mean. The CI group's performance did not differ significantly from that of the NH group for print knowledge. For the CI group, phonological awareness and print knowledge were significantly correlated with language, speech production, and speech perception. Together these predictor variables accounted for 34% of variance in the CI group's phonological awareness but no significant variance in their print knowledge. Conclusions: Children with CIs have the potential to develop age-appropriate early literacy skills by preschool age but are likely to lag behind their NH peers in phonological awareness. Intervention programs serving these children should target these skills with instruction and by facilitating speech and language development. (author abstract)

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Preschool speech, language skills, and reading at 7, 9, and 10 years: Etiology of the relationship
Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E., April 2010
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53(3), 311-332

A study of both genetic and environmental factors' contributions to the relationship between measurements of both preschool speech and language and later reading skills, based on data from 1,672 twins assessed at 7, 9, and 10 years of age

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Preschool speech, language skills, and reading at 7, 9, and 10 years: Etiology of the relationship
Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E., April, 2010
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53(3), 311-332

Twin analyses to assess the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the longitudinal relationships between speech and reading skills at 4-years-old and language and reading skills at 7-, 9-, and 10-years-old, based on data from 1,672 children born in England and Wales from the Twins Early Development Study

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Problem behaviors of low-income children with language delays: An observation study
Huaqing Qi, Cathy, 2004
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 47(3), 595-609

A study comparing the behavioral differences between preschool children with language delays and their typically developing peers

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A randomized comparison of the effect of two prelinguistic communication interventions on the acquisition of spoken communication in preschoolers with ASD
Yoder, Paul, August 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49(4), 698-711

A randomized group experiment comparing the effectiveness of two different communication interventions on the oral language skills of preschool children with autism

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The role of home literacy practices in preschool children's language and emergent literacy skills
Roberts, Joanne E., 2005
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 48(2), 345-359

An examination of the impact of home literacy activities (frequency of shared book reading, maternal book reading strategies, child's enjoyment of reading, maternal sensitivity) on low income, African American preschool children's language and emergent literacy skills

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Theoretical explanations for preschoolers' lowercase alphabet knowledge
Turnbull, Khara Pence, December 2010
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53(6), 1757-1768

A study of several measures of children's letter knowledge, including the relationships among lowercase letter knowledge and uppercase familiarity, uppercase-lowercase similarity, own-name advantage, and frequency in printed English, based on data from 461 low income 3- through 5-year-olds in public preschools

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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