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Defining quality care for looked after children: Frontline workers' perspectives on standards and all that?
Watson, David, 2003
Child & Family Social Work, 8(1), 67-77

An examination of residential child care workers’ definition of quality of care and to consider implications the performance standards will have on residential childcare

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Facilitating access to services for children and families: Lessons from Sure Start local programmes
Garbers, Claudia, November 2006
Child & Family Social Work, 11(4), 287-296

An examination of strategies employed to maximize access and use of community-based social service programs by poor families with children under 4-years-old in the United Kingdom, drawn from the findings of a government-commissioned evaluation on implementation of Sure Start Local Programme (SSLP) initiatives

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Leaving children unattended at home: Decision-making on the use of self-care in Hong Kong
Tam, Vicky C. W., 1998
Child & Family Social Work, 3(2), 125-135

An examination of the decisions made by low-income mothers from Hong Kong on the use of self-care

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Placed and paid for: A national overview of the use of private and voluntary day care facilities for children in need
Dillon, Jean, 1998
Child & Family Social Work, 3(2), 113-123

An exploration of the practice, organization, and local implications of subsidized child care in the United Kingdom beneath The England and Wales Children Act of 1989, using Department of Health data from a 1996 research project

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Putting fathers on the child welfare agenda
Featherstone, Brid, 2001
Child & Family Social Work, 6(2), 179-186

A review of research on the role of fathers in children’s development, fathers and physical violence, and issues which arise for child care professionals when engaging fathers

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Research review: Family centres: A review of the literature
Warren-Adamson, Chris, 2006
Child & Family Social Work, 11(2), 171-182

A review of the literature, from the 1980s to the present, about family centres--community based preschool child care centers which also provide other family and social services--in the United Kingdom

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Resettlement challenges faced by refugee claimant families in Montreal: Lack of access to child care
Morantz, Gillian, August, 2013
Child & Family Social Work, 18(3), 318-328

Adult refugee claimants experience several well-documented post-migratory challenges. Little is known about the resettlement process for refugee claimant families with children. This study reports on 75 open-ended, in-depth interviews with refugee claimant families in Montreal about their resettlement challenges and their proposed solutions to them. These interviews were conducted with 33 dyads and triads of children and parents attending a paediatric hospital. Experiences accessing formal and informal child care in Montreal were addressed. Subsequently, a comparative policy analysis was conducted on residency eligibility criteria for child care subsidization. Twenty-eight out of 39 parents (73%) report a lack of informal or formal child care and 15 out of 33 families (39%) propose improving access to formal child care services. They describe a lack of informal child care as a result of reduced social networks, and affordability as a barrier to formal child care services. Refugee claimants are not eligible for subsidized child care in Quebec. A comparative policy analysis within Canada and comparable countries reveals that this situation is not unique to Quebec. However, most provinces and European countries offer child care subsidies to refugee claimants. Refugee claimants should qualify for child care subsidies. Social workers and community organizations should consider their clients' child care needs in designing programmes and services. (author abstract)

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Two-generation preschool programme: Immediate and 7-year-old outcomes for low-income children and their parents
Benzies, Karen, May, 2014
Child & Family Social Work, 19(2), 203-214

Preschool children living in low-income families are at increased risk for poor outcomes; early intervention programmes mitigate these risks. While there is considerable evidence of the effectiveness of centre-based programmes in other jurisdictions, there is limited research about Canadian programmes, specifically programmes that include children and parents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single-site, two-generation preschool demonstration programme for low-income families in Canada. A single group, pre-test (programme intake) /post-test (programme exit) design with a 7-year-old follow-up was used. Between intake and exit, significant improvements in receptive language and global development were found among the children, and significant improvements in self-esteem, use of community resources, parenting stress and risk for child maltreatment were found among the parents. These positive improvements were sustained until the children were 7 years old. Public investment in two-generation preschool programmes may mitigate risks for suboptimal child development and improve parental psychosocial outcomes. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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