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After-school tutoring in the context of No Child Left Behind: Effectiveness of two programs in the Pittsburgh Public Schools
Zimmer, Ron W., February 2010
Economics of Education Review, 29(1), 18-28

An examination of the relationship between both student math and reading scores and participation in either the supplemental education services program or the educational assistance program, and a study of program features associated with academic achievement, from surveys and test scores of participating students from the Pittsburgh Public Schools

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Benefits and costs of investments in preschool education: Evidence from the Child-Parent Centers and related programs
Temple, Judy A., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 126-144

A discussion of preschool program effectiveness in 3 intervention studies, as well as a cost-benefit analysis of the Chicago Child-Parent Center preschool program as compared to other intervention programs for children, such as prenatal and infancy care, reduced class size, grade retention, and youth job training

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Benefits of early childhood interventions across the world: (Under) Investing in the very young
Nores, Milagros, April, 2010
Economics of Education Review, 29(2), 271-282

A review of the international (non-U.S.) evidence on the benefits of early childhood interventions in the area of cognition, behavior, health, and schooling, with a total of 38 contrasts of 30 interventions in 23 countries with a focus on studies applying a quasi-experimental or random assignment design

Literature Review


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Child care subsidies and child development
Herbst, Chris M., August, 2010
Economics of Education Review, 29(4), 618-638

Child care subsidies are an important part of federal and state efforts to move welfare recipients into employment. One of the criticisms of the current subsidy system, however, is that it overemphasizes work and does little to encourage parents to purchase high-quality child care. Consequently, there are reasons to be concerned about the implications of child care subsidies for child development. In this paper, we provide a systematic assessment of the association between subsidy receipt and a wide range of child outcomes. Drawing on rich data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, we document a negative relationship between child care subsidies and child development. In particular, our results suggest that subsidy receipt in the year before kindergarten is associated with lower reading and math test scores and greater behavior problems at kindergarten entry. Some of these negative effects persist until the end of kindergarten. A potential explanation for the poorer outcomes is that subsidized children are more likely to receive intense exposure to low-quality child care. (author abstract)

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Comparative benefit-cost analysis of the Abecedarian program and its policy implications
Barnett, W. Steven, February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 113-125

A longitudinal study of the costs and benefits of the Carolina Abecedarian Project, a preschool program providing intensive education and full-time child care five days a week to children from economically disadvantaged families, with a focus on program expenses and the educational, cognitive, and economic effects on participants, and comparisons to the High Scope/Perry and other preschool programs

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Daycare quality and regulation: A queuing-theoretic approach
Mulligan, James, 1998
Economics of Education Review, 17(1), 1-13

A study of the influence of caregiver to child ratios on the amount of time children spend on-task and the intensity of caregiver attention to child interactions

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Do child care subsidies influence single mothers' decision to invest in human capital?
Herbst, Chris M., October, 2011
Economics of Education Review, 30(5), 901-912

An examination of the relationship between child care subsidy receipt and the likelihood of engaging in education and job training activities, based on data from single mothers of 3,848 children in the Early Childhood Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten base year cohort

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Does delaying kindergarten entrance give children a head start?
Datar, Ashlesha, 2006
Economics of Education Review, 25(1), 43-62

A study of the effect of delayed kindergarten entrance on children's reading and math achievement after two years in school, based on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal StudyKindergarten Class (ECLS-K)

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Does full-day kindergarten matter?: Evidence from the first two years of schooling
DeCicca, Philip, February, 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 67-82

A comparative analysis of the kindergarten and first grade reading and mathematics test scores of a sample of 8,164 children, based on whether they attended half-time or full-time kindergarten, with results separated into race groups of White, Hispanic, and Afro-American

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Does prekindergarten improve school preparation and performance?
Magnuson, Katherine A., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 33-51

An analysis of children’s academic and behavioral outcomes in the fall of kindergarten as a function of their pre-kindergarten childcare experiences, using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) for a sample of 10,224 children

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Do peers influence children's skill development in preschool?
Henry, Gary T., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 100-112

An examination of the relationship between peer abilities and educational outcomes in preschool children, based on data from the Early Childhood Study in Georgia, which included 630 participants from full-time private preschool, public subsidized pre-kindergarten, and Head Start programs

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Earnings benefits of Tulsa's pre-k program for different income groups
Bartik, Timothy J., December, 2012
Economics of Education Review, 31(6), 1143-1161

An estimation of future adult earnings associated with participation in universal prekindergarten in Tulsa, Oklahoma, based on an analysis of student prekindergarten and kindergarten test scores and projections of the relationship of early test scores to future earnings

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The economics of early childhood education [Special issue]
Belfield, Clive R., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1)

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Educational vouchers for universal pre-schools
Levin, Henry M., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 3-16

A description of Georgia's universal child care system in which vouchers are issued within a regulated market, and a comparison of this approach with the national Head Start system

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The effectiveness of extended day programs: Evidence from a randomized field experiment in the Netherlands
Meyer, Erik, October, 2013
Economics of Education Review, 36(), 1-11

Policies that aim at improving student achievement frequently increase instructional time, for example by means of an extended day program. There is, however, hardly any evidence that these programs are effective, and the few studies that allow causal inference indicate that we should expect neutral to small effects of such programs. This study conducts a randomized field experiment to estimate the effect of an extended day program in seven Dutch elementary schools on math and language achievement. The empirical results show that this three-month program had no significant effect on math or language achievement. (author abstract)

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The effects of welfare and employment programs on children's participation in Head Start
Chang, Young Eun, February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 17-32

An analysis of the effects of 10 welfare and employment programs on the employment, income, and use of Head Start by single mothers of children aged 3-5, using data from the New Hope, New Chance, National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies, and Minnesota Family Investment Program studies

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Expanding schooling opportunities for 4-year-olds
Leuven, Edwin, June 2010
Economics of Education Review, 29(3), 319-328

An econometric approach to estimate the influence of expanding early education enrollment opportunities on test scores from five waves of bi-annual survey data on Dutch pupils enrolled in grades 2, 4, 6, and 8

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Getting inside the "Black Box" of Head Start quality: What matters and what doesn’t
Currie, Janet, February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 83-99

A study of the correlation between student outcomes and per capita Head Start spending during years of attendance, using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and Head Start administrative reports

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How much is too much?: The influence of preschool centers on children's social and cognitive development
Loeb, Susanna, February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 52-66

An analysis of effects of center-based care prior to kindergarten on children’s cognitive and social-behavioral capacities upon kindergarten entry, according to intensity and duration of center attendance, and social and ethnic group, using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K)

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The impact of pre-school on adolescents' outcomes: Evidence from a recent English cohort
Apps, Patricia, December, 2013
Economics of Education Review, 37(), 183-199

This paper investigates the relationship between attendance at pre-school school and children's outcomes into early adulthood. In particular, we are interested in: child cognitive development at ages 11, 14 and 16; intentions towards tertiary education; economic activity in early adulthood; a group of non-cognitive outcomes such as risky health behaviour; and personality traits. Using matching methods to control for a very rich set of child and family characteristics, we find evidence that pre-school childcare moderately improves results in cognitive tests at age 11 and 14, and 16. Positive effects are especially noticeable for girls and children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds. Results for non-cognitive outcomes are weaker: we do not find any significant evidence of improvement in psychological well-being, petty crime involvement, or on almost all health behaviours. While the cognitive effects may well serve to reduce lifecycle inequalities there is no support here for other important social benefits. (author abstract)

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The impact of short-term economic fluctuations on kindergarten enrollment
Herman, Douglas A., June 2010
Economics of Education Review, 29(3), 423-431

A study of the relationship between the rates of unemployment and both kindergarten and prekindergarten enrollment, based on state enrollment data and employment data from the Current Population Survey, October Supplements, from 1977 through 2003

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The impact of vouchers on preschool attendance and elementary school readiness: A randomized controlled trial in rural China
Wong, Ho Lun, August, 2013
Economics of Education Review, 35(), 53-65

Although preschool has been shown to improve children's school readiness in many developing countries, preschool attendance in poor rural areas of China is still low. The high cost of preschool is often regarded as a major barrier to attendance. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of a one-year voucher/CCT intervention on preschool attendance and school readiness. To do so, we conducted a randomized controlled trial among 150 young children in a poor, rural county in China. Our analysis shows that the intervention, consisting of a tuition waiver and a cash transfer conditional on attendance, raised attendance by 20 percentage points (or by 35%). However, the intervention did not have measurable impact on children's school readiness. We believe that poor quality of preschool education in rural China (in terms of both teaching and facilities) contributes to our findings. (author abstract)

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Introduction to the special issue 'The economics of early childhood education': Economics of education review
Belfield, Clive R., February 2007
Economics of Education Review, 26(1), 1-2

An overview of the burgeoning research interest among economists in early childhood education, in the areas of public policy issues, equity concerns, and societal returns on educational investments

Other


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Is there a crowding-out effect between school expenditure and mother's child care time?
Kim, Hong-Kyun, 2001
Economics of Education Review, 20(1), 71-80

An examination of the relationship between school expenditure and parental child care time in an effort to examine the secondary effect of school expenditure on student performance

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Kindergarten skills and fifth-grade achievement: Evidence from the ECLS-K
Claessens, Amy, August 2009
Economics of Education Review, 28(4), 415-427

A study of the relationship between fifth grade math or reading achievement and children's academic skills, attention-related skills and socioemotional skills in kindergarten, based on a secondary analysis of a nationally representative longitudinal study of children beginning in kindergarten through fifth grade

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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