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Africentric Home Environment Inventory
Caughy, Margaret O'Brien, 2002
Journal of Black Psychology, 28(1), 37-52

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Correlates of low-income African American and Puerto Rican fathers' involvement with their children
Fagan, Jay, 1998
Journal of Black Psychology, 24(3), 351-367

A study of sociostructural, psychological, and parenting skill determinants of parental involvement in socioeconomically disadvantaged Puerto Rican and African American fathers of preschool-age children

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A preliminary study of low-income African American fathers' play interactions with their preschool-age children
Fagan, Jay, 1996
Journal of Black Psychology, 22(1), 7-19

An investigation of the association between low income African-American fathers' play interactions with their children and both the fathers' self-esteem levels and feelings toward the children's mothers, based on data from 33 African-American men with preschool children enrolled in a Head Start program

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Using PANDA (Preventing the Abuse of Tobacco, Narcotics, Drugs, and Alcohol) in a Baltimore city Head Start setting: A preliminary study
Belcher, Harolyn M. E., 2000
Journal of Black Psychology, 26(4), 437-449

A study on the role of the Preventing the Abuse of Tobacco, Narcotics, Drugs and Alcohol (PANDA) curriculum in the increases in the self-concept of children, based on a sample of 41 children ages 3- to 5-years old, assessed using the Joseph Preschool and Primary Self-Concept Screening Test (JPPSST)

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