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Child care choices in Spain
Marcos, Cristina Borra, December, 2009
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 30(4), 323-338

An econometric study of the relationship between families' child care choices and the relative prices of various types of care, families' economic resources, changes in family needs as children grow, and availability of care, based on a survey of 1,615 households from both the Spanish Time Use Survey and Household Budget Survey

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Child care subsidy use and child care quality in low-wealth, rural communities
De Marco, Allison, 2014
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, (),

Child care subsidy programs serve to reduce the number of families for whom child care is a barrier to work. Child care is essential to economic self-sufficiency, and it can also support child development, particularly for low-income children. However, most research has an urban focus so little is known about rural settings where formal programs are limited and of lower quality. In this paper we examine the subsidy use of rural families, the care arrangements they make, and the quality of care received. We utilized data collected between 2004 and 2007 from the Family Life Project, a representative, longitudinal study of non-metro families in low-wealth counties (n = 1,292), oversampled for low-income and African-American families. Families who used subsidies were more likely to select center-based care, typically of higher quality. Further, these families were also more likely to receive higher quality care, regardless of the type chosen, even after accounting for a host of family and community factors. Findings suggest that subsidy programs have successfully moved low-income children into higher quality care beneficial for development. These findings point to the need to maintain subsidy programs and encourage eligible families to take advantage of such resources. (author abstract)

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Child care use and parental desire to switch care type among a low-income population
Wolfe, Barbara, 2004
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 25(2), 139-162

An investigation of child care choice, use, quality, and satisfaction among low income mothers participating in Wisconsin's welfare-to-work program

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Child care utilization among working mothers raising children with disabilities
Brandon, Peter D., 2000
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 21(4), 343-364

An investigation into the factors influencing the utilization of child care by mothers of children with disabilities, based on a subsample of mothers and their children from the Survey on Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

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Child day care and the employment of AFDC recipients with preschool children
Bowen, Gary, 1993
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 14(1), 49-69

An investigation of the role of subsidized child care in reducing welfare participation among families with preschool-aged children in the United States

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A comprehensive employment model for low-income mothers
Urban, Julie A., 2005
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 26(1), 101-122

An analysis of employment models for low income mothers, using longitudinal data from the Comprehensive Child Development Program

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Cracks in the seams: Durability of child care in JOBS welfare-to-work programs
Meyers, Marcia K., 1997
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 18(4), 379-406

An analysis of the integration of targeted child care subsidies and services and transitions for low-income participants in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) welfare-to-work program

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Decision-making of mothers in Hong Kong regarding the occasional use of alternative child care arrangements
Tam, Vicky C. W., 1999
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 20(2), 163-190

An examination of the family context in an attempt to improve the understanding of chosing alternative child care arrangements

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Employed rural, low-income, single mothers' family and work over time
Son, Seohee, March 2010
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 31(1), 107-120

A study of perceptions of difficulties and challenges of balancing family, child care, and work responsibilities, based on a secondary analysis of interview data with of 28 rural, low-income, continuously employed, and single mothers across 11 states over three waves of data collection between 1999 and 2003, who took part in the longitidunal Rural Families Speak Project

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For love or money: Costs of child care by relatives
Folk, Karen F., 1994
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 14(3), 243-261

An analysis of data from the 1990 National Survey of Families and Households focusing on the use and costs of relative child care

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How employed mothers in Australia find time for both market work and childcare
Craig, Lyn, March 2007
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 28(1), 69-87

An investigation of how employed mothers in Australia try to use child care to make adjustments in other forms of time use and to shift times when they are together with their children

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The impact of child care subsidies on low-income single parents: An examination of child care expenditures and family finances
Forry, Nicole D., March 2009
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 30(1), 43-54

A study of the associations between child care subsidy receipt and both family finances and the out-of-pocket costs of care, based on data collected from samples of two low income populations

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The impact of intergenerational Head Start participation on success measures among adolescent children
Caputo, Richard K., 2004
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 25(2), 199-223

A journal article using child-mother data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to examine the adolescent outcomes of intergenerational Head Start participation

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Labor force supply decisions of rural low-income mothers
Mammen, Sheila, March, 2009
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 30(1), 67-79

A microeconomic study of the associations between both rural low income mothers' decision to work and number of hours worked and mother's individual characteristics, household characteristics, human capital, various household income sources including participation in child care assistance and the Earned Income Tax Credit, and local economic conditions, based on data from 412 families from 23 counties in 13 states

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Managing work and family: The decision to outsource child care in families engaged in family-owned businesses
Avery, Rosemary J., 2000
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 21(3), 227-258

An investigation of the decision of families involved in family-owned businesses to outsource child care, using a management framework emphasizing inputs to the decision and level of management activity

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Occupational structure and the employment of American mothers of young children
Edwards, Mark Evan, 2005
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 26(1), 31-53

A paper that focused on the growing availability of professional, technical, and managerial positions to examine the trend of increased employment for mothers with young children

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The relationship between work-life policies and practices and employee loyalty: A life course perspective
Roehling, Patricia V., 2001
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 22(2), 141-170

A study of workplace policies with relevant life course variables and their influence on employee loyalty

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Relatives as child care givers: After hours support for nontraditional workers
Hunts, Holly Jo, 1998
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 19(4), 315-341

A descriptive study of different family child care arrangements for working families

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Spousal childcare involvement and perceived support for paid work
Press, Julie E., Summer 2006
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 27(2), 354-374

A study of the role of parent gender in the correlations between perceptions of spousal support for paid work and spousal involvement in the care of children, as well as variations in work hours and job flexibility, family characteristics, and the division of household labor, based on the questionnaire responses of both mothers and fathers heading 76 intact families with young children in the Philadelphia region

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Transitions on the margins of work and family life for low-income African-American Fathers
Roy, Kevin M., 2005
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 26(1), 77-100

An examination of the relationship between patterns of work engagement and transitions in family residence and dynamics of family life among low-income African-American fathers in local Chicago communities

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Where are the children?: Extent and determinants of preschoolers' child care time
Joesch, Jutta M., 1998
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 19(1), 75-99

A survey of children’s duration in nonparental child care under the age of six

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Why do they leave?: Child care subsidy use in Oregon
Grobe, Deana, March, 2008
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 29(1), 110-127

This study fills an important gap about child care subsidy participation by exploring why parents leave the subsidy program in Oregon. Descriptive analyses using administrative data showed unexpectedly high levels of employment stability and low levels of family mobility. Many families appeared to remain eligible after exit based on earnings and participation in other means-tested assistance programs. Estimates from a Cox regression model showed that subsidy policies were associated with exits. Being in the last month of an eligibility period increased the likelihood of exiting the subsidy program by two to three times. This result suggests that lengthening eligibility period could increase the stability of subsidy usage and possibly subsidized child care arrangements. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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