Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters:

10 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

*

The Birth to School Study: Evidence on the effectiveness of PEEP, an early intervention for children at risk of educational under-achievement
Evangelou, Maria, November 2007
Oxford Review of Education, 33(5), 581-609

Findings from the Birth to School Study (BTSS), a longitudinal evaluation of the Peers Early Education Partnership (PEEP), a family-focused program aimed at promoting early literacy, numeracy, and self esteem in the United Kingdom

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Changes in children's cognitive development at the start of school in England 2001-2008
Merrell, Christine, 2011
Oxford Review of Education, 37(3), 333-345

Findings from a longitudinal examination of the cognitive skills possessed by children at the start of school, based on the annual assessment of more than 14,000 four-year-old children from 472 schools in the United Kingdom during a period of increasing availability of early education

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Can pre-school education affect children's achievement in primary school?
Daniels, Sandra, 1995
Oxford Review of Education, 21(2), 163-178

A study investigating the relationship between preschool attendance and young children's later school achievements

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Can starting summer-born children earlier at infant school improve their National Curriculum results?
Daniels, Sandra, 2000
Oxford Review of Education, 26(2), 207-220

An investigation of the effect of the length of schooling for children who were born later than their peers as compared with the effect of their age on their National Curriculum scores

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The effects of preschool education: Some American and British evidence
Smith, George, 1975
Oxford Review of Education, 1(3), 223-240

A historical presentation of results from pre-school curriculum experiments in Britain and the United States in the 1960s and 1970s

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The objectives and organisation of educational and day care services for young children
Tizard, Jack, 1975
Oxford Review of Education, 1(3), 211-221

A discussion of child care and education funding, provisions and potential benefits

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The objectives and organization of educational and day care services for young children
Tizard, Jack, 1975
Oxford Review of Education, 1(3), 211-221

A study of the objectives and organization of education and child care services for young children under the age of five in the United Kingdom

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Pre-school education has long-term effects: But can they be generalized?
Woodhead, Martin, 1985
Oxford Review of Education, 11(2), 133-155

A discussion of the generalizability of research conducted in the United States on preschool education in British contexts

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The pre-school education market in England from 1997: Quality, availability, affordability and equality
West, Anne, 2006
Oxford Review of Education, 32(3), 283-301

A historical analysis of changes in the preschool education market in England since 1997, examining the extent to which the Labor Government's National Childcare Strategy's three key objectives (availability, quality, affordability) have been improved upon

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Transforming the early years in England
Sylva, Kathy, 2005
Oxford Review of Education, 31(1), 11-27

An examination of changes in early education in England from 1997-2004, focusing on policy innovations, expansion of child care and early education services, as well as issues with current policies that need to be taken into account by policymakers

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate