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Children's schooling and parents' behavior: Evidence from the Head Start Impact Study
Gelber, Alexander M., May, 2013
Journal of Public Economics, 101(), 25-38

Parents may have important effects on their children, but little work in economics explores whether children's schooling opportunities crowd out or encourage parents' investment in children. We analyze data from the Head Start Impact Study, which granted randomly chosen preschool-aged children the opportunity to attend Head Start. We find that Head Start causes a substantial increase in parents' involvement with their children--such as time spent reading to children, math activities, or days spent with children by fathers who do not live with their children--both during and after the period when their children are potentially enrolled in Head Start. (author abstract)

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Does Head Start help Hispanic children?
Currie, Janet, 1999
Journal of Public Economics, 74(2), 235-262

A discussion of results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) showing the benefits of Head Start to Hispanic children, such as improvement closing test score and poor literacy gaps

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The effect of pre-primary education on primary school performance
Berlinski, Samuel, February, 2009
Journal of Public Economics, 93(1-2), 219-234

An empirical study of the relationship between universal pre-primary education and primary school performance in Argentina, based on a comparison of test scores of children to whom pre-primary education was made available at different times during the roll-out of the national pre-primary education program

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Giving children a better start: Preschool attendance and school-age profiles
Berlinski, Samuel, June, 2008
Journal of Public Economics, 92(5-6), 1416-1440

A study of the relationship between preprimary education experiences and the educational attainment of children ages 7 to 16 in Uruguay, based on data collected from a representative household survey

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Home alone: Supervision after school and child behavior
Aizer, Anna, 2004
Journal of Public Economics, 88(9-10), 1835-1848

A study of the impact of after school adult supervision on behavioral outcomes, including school truancy, minor criminal activity, alcohol or drug use and hurting someone, for children ages 10-14 years old

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The impact of non-parental child care on child development: Evidence from the summer participation "dip"
Herbst, Chris M., September, 2013
Journal of Public Economics, 105(), 86-105

Although a large literature examines the effect of non-parental child care on preschool-aged children's cognitive development, few studies deal convincingly with the potential endogeneity of child care choices. Using a panel of infants and toddlers from the Birth cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B), this paper attempts to provide causal estimates by leveraging heretofore unrecognized seasonal variation in child care participation. Child assessments in the ECLS-B were conducted on a rolling basis throughout the year, and I use the participation "dip" among those assessed during the summer as the basis for an instrumental variable. The summer participation dip is likely to be exogenous because ECLS-B administrators strictly controlled the mechanism by which children were assigned to assessment dates. The OLS results show that children utilizing non-parental arrangements score higher on tests of cognitive ability, a finding that holds after accounting for individual fixed effects. However, the instrumental variables estimates point to sizeable negative effects of non-parental care. The adverse effects are driven by participation in formal settings, and, contrary to previous research, I find that disadvantaged children do not benefit from exposure to non-parental care. (author abstract)

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Money for nothing?: Universal child care and maternal employment
Havnes, Tarjei, December, 2011
Journal of Public Economics, 95(11-12), 1455-1465

An examination of the relationship between universal subsidized child care and maternal employment, based on data from administrative registers from Statistics Norway from 1967 through 2006

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Non-cognitive child outcomes and universal high quality child care
Gupta, Nabanita Datta, February 2010
Journal of Public Economics, 94(1-2), 30-43

A longitudinal investigation of the links between children’s enrollment in high-quality child care and children’s outcomes at age 7 in Denmark

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The rate of return to the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., February 2010
Journal of Public Economics, 94(1-2), 114-128

An estimation of the cost-benefit ratio and rate of return for the High/Scope Perry Preschool program, with a focus on the economic benefits and impact on crime

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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