Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters:

14 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

*

After-school program impact on physical activity and fitness: A meta-analysis
Beets, Michael W., June 2009
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 36(3), 527-537

A Meta-analysis of 13 articles from 11 after-school interventions on the effectiveness of after-school programs in increasing physical activity

Literature Review


get fulltext

*

''Block the sun, not the fun'': Evaluation of a skin cancer prevention program for child care centers
Crane, Lori A., 1999
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 17(1), 31-37

An evaluation of a skin cancer prevention program for preschools and child care centers

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The childcare environment and children's physical activity
Bower, Julie K., January 2008
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 34(1)

A study of the relationship between child care environment and children's physical activities from direct observations in 20 child care centers over 2 days

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The effectiveness of early childhood development programs: A systematic review
Anderson, Laurie M., 2003
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 24(Suppl. 3), 32-46

A summary of a cost-benefit analysis of early detection and intervention programs for children with autism spectrum disorders or at risk of low educational attainment

Literature Review


get fulltext

*

Expanding developmental and behavioral services for newborns in primary care: Effects on parental well-being, practice, and satisfaction
Johnston, Brian D., 2004
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 26(4), 356-366

A study measuring parent satisfaction with the PrePare prenatal care service compared to other types of prenatal programs or care as usual

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Expanding developmental and behavioral services for newborns in primary care: Implications of the findings
Thompson, Robert S., 2004
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 26(4), 367-371

A longitudinal study reporting the resulting effects of Healthy Steps (HS) when participating infants have reached three months of age; implications for families, pediatric practice, healthcare systems, policy, and future research are discussed

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Expanding developmental and behavioral services for newborns in primary care: Program design, delivery, and evaluation framework
Morisset-Huebner, Colleen, 2004
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 26(4), 344-355

A longitudinal study evaluating the effects of the early intervention services of Healthy Steps and Healthy Steps Specialists on families during pregnancy and in the newborn period

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Factors affecting environmental awareness among Head Start families in Mississippi
Preston, Benjamin L., 2000
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 19(3), 174-180

A study on the influences of urbanization, race/ethnicity, and education on the environmental awareness and exposure to environmental hazards of low-income Head Start families, based on a sample of 763 low-income, female-headed households in the Mississippi Delta

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The Healthy Afterschool Activity and Nutrition Documentation instrument
Ajja, Rahma, September, 2012
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 43(3), 263-271

An evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Healthy Afterschool Activity and Nutrition Documentation (HAAND) instrument, which consists of two subscales: the Healthy Afterschool Program Index for Physical Activity (HAPI-PA) and the Healthy Afterschool Program Index-Nutrition (HAPI-N), based on data from 39 after school programs serving 2,073 children in both Columbia and Lexington, South Carolina and Omaha, Nebraska

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Healthy starts for all: Policy prescriptions
Miller, Wilhelmine D., January 2011
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(1), s19-s37

An update on the health of American infants, children, and youth, an identification of evidence-based policies and interventions to improve developmental and health outcomes for young children, and a consideration of current state and federal policies and programmatic initiatives, with policy recommendations for families and young children at risk of poor developmental outcomes

Other


get fulltext

*

Nutrition and physical activity in child care: Results from an environmental intervention
Ward, Dianne S., October 2008
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(4), 352-356

A study of the impact of a Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention to promote healthy weight development in preschool children on child care practices, environments, and polieces in 56 intervention centers and 26 control sites in North Carolina over six months

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

A nutrition and physical activity intervention for family child care homes
Trost, Stewart G., October, 2011
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41(4), 392-398

A study of the effect of the Healthy Kansas Kids workshops for family child care providers on the self-reported measures of nutrition and physical activity at family child care homes across Kansas

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Nutrition and physical activity policies and practices in family child care homes
Trost, Stewart G., December 2009
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(6), 537-540

A survey of policies and practices related to nutrition and physical activity in a stratified sample of 297 registered Kansas family child care homes

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

A participatory physical activity intervention in preschools: A cluster randomized controlled trial
De Bock, Freia, July, 2013
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45(1), 64-74

Background: Previous studies on physical activity interventions in preschools have reported limited effectiveness. Participatory community-based approaches hold promise for increasing intervention effectiveness and involving parents as key stakeholders in a sustainable way. Purpose: To assess whether a participatory parent-focused approach using parents as agents of behavioral change enhances the efficacy of a preschool physical activity (PA) intervention. Design: Two-armed, cluster-RCT with preschool as unit of randomization and children as unit of analysis. Setting/participants: 39 South German preschools applying for an existing state-sponsored PA program with 826 children (52% boys, aged 5.0 +/- 0.2 years), with 441 allocated to the intervention arm. Intervention: Control preschools received a state-sponsored program consisting of twice-weekly gym classes over 6 months. In intervention preschools, this program was augmented by motivating parents to develop and implement their own project ideas for promoting children's PA. Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes included mean accelerometry counts and time spent in moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA or sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes were BMI, percentage body fat, quality of life, sleep quality, and general health. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6 and 12 months in both study arms (time period: 2008-2010). Using an intention-to-treat-analysis, linear multilevel regression models assessed change over time and across study arms, adjusted for age, gender, season, and preschool location. Analysis was conducted in 2011. Results: In 15 intervention preschools, parents implemented 25 PA projects. Compared with controls, intervention arm children were 11 minutes less sedentary per day (95% CI=5.39, 17.01, p=0.014); had significantly more mean accelerometry counts (1.4 counts/15 seconds [95% CI=0.22, 2.54], p=0.019); and showed benefits in perceived general health and quality of life. All other outcomes showed no difference between study arms. Conclusions: A participatory preschool intervention focusing on parents as agents of behavioral change may be able to promote PA and reduce sedentary behavior in preschoolers. These benefits may go beyond the effects of existing nonparticipatory interventions. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate