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Children's Social Competence Scale
Gesten, Ellis L., 1976
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 44(5), 775-786

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Community-based resilient peer treatment of withdrawn maltreated preschool children
Fantuzzo, John W., 1996
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(6), 1377-1386

A study concerning the differences in social play of maltreated and nonmaltreated preschool children and the effectiveness of a resilient peer treatment (RPT) for socially withdrawn victims of physical abuse and neglect

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Continuous Performance Task
Rosvold, Haldor E., 1956
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 20, 343-350

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Life Experiences Survey
Sarason, Irwin G., 1978
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 46(5), 932-946

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Mental Health Inventory
Veit, Clairice T., 1983
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51(5), 730-742

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Parent training of toddlers in day care in low-income urban communities
Gross, Deborah, 2003
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71(2), 261-278

An evaluation of the child behavioral outcomes of a parent training program for low-income parents of toddlers and child care center teachers

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Pathways from teacher depression and child-care quality to child behavioral problems
Jeon, Lieny, April, 2014
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82(2), 225-235

The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among teacher depression, global child-care quality, and child internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems in early child-care settings. Method: We analyzed data from 3-year-old children (N = 761) and their mothers, primarily of disadvantaged socioeconomic status in urban areas, in the late 1990s using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. We also had data from the children's teachers, who reported their own depressed moods. Child behavioral problems were reported by both teachers and parents, and global environmental quality of child care was observed. Path analysis tested direct and indirect effects of teacher depression on children's behavioral problems via global child-care quality. Results: Teacher depression was directly and indirectly linked to teacher-reported externalizing and internalizing problems through observed global child-care quality, whereas for parent-reported outcomes, teacher depression was only directly related to children's internalizing problems. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that teachers' depressive symptoms can be a contributor to global environmental child-care quality and to child externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems. Practical implications are that programs and policies must take into account effects of teacher depression on child-care quality and young children's school readiness regarding behavioral problems. Future research should further explore these relationships. (author abstract)

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Preventing conduct problems in Head Start children: Strengthening parenting competencies
Webster-Stratton, Carolyn, 1998
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66(5), 715-530

A study of the effectiveness of a parenting intervention program with Head Start mothers

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Self-Control Rating Scale
Kendall, Philip C., 1979
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 47(6), 1020-1029

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Teacher Version of the Child Behavior Profile: I. Boys aged 6-11
Edelbrock, Craig S., 1984
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52(2), 207-217

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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