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Between ideology and economy: The ''time politics'' of child care and public education in the two Germanys
Hagemann, Karen, 2006
Social Politics, 13(2), 217-260

An examination of the time politics of child care and public education through a comparison of developments in the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic after 1945

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Caring as social right: Cash for child care and daddy leave
Leira, Arnlaug, 1998
Social Politics, 5(3), 362-378

A study of policies aimed at gender division in family child care and employment policies in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway

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Child care in Canada and Sweden: Policy and politics
Mahon, Rianne, 1997
Social Politics, 4(3), 382-418

An analysis of policies affecting child care arrangements in Canada and Sweden

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Child care in Poland before, during, and after the transition: Still a women's business
Heinen, Jacqueline, 2006
Social Politics, 13(2), 189-216

A historical analysis of child care policies in Poland and a discussion of the impact of these policies on gender equality and inequality

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Child care: Toward what kind of ''social Europe''?
Mahon, Rianne, 2002
Social Politics, 9(3), 343-379

An examination of the three dominant alternatives of child care arrangements within the European Union

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Claims for child care as struggles over needs: Comparing Italian and Danish women's organizations
Bertone, Chiara, 2003
Social Politics, 10(2), 229-255

An examination of Italian and Danish women's organizations claims to their respective states for public support for child care during the 1960s and early 1970s

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Continuity and change in English childcare policy 1960-2000
Lewis, Jane, Fall 2013
Social Politics, 20(3), 358-386

The failure of the UK to develop a coherent, universal, public system of childcare in the post-war period is well known. More recently, there has been a strong debate as to whether the New Labour Governments' explicit childcare policies, first set out in 1998, represent a substantial change or whether policy continuities are more significant. This paper uses ideas about incremental policy change, together with a close investigation of archival as well as other documentary materials, to investigate the nature of continuity and change over the period 1960-2000. The findings are rather different for early years education and for early years care. While there was support in principle for the former across the political divide, this did not translate into policy action. Early years care, on the other hand, was actively opposed (other than for children "at risk") largely because of ideas about the importance of maternal care in the 1960s and 1970s, and because of strong political opposition to the idea of childcare as a matter for the state in the 1980s and most of the 1990s. As a result, the mixed economy of childcare was effectively strengthened over the whole period. Nor was this changed by New Labour's intervention in childcare. However, the increasing complexity of the mixed economy of providers resulted in a more united campaign for a national strategy. New Labour's willingness to take responsibility for developing childcare policy and to spend more public money on it was the most important change in the late 1990s. (author abstract)

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How are Swedish women faring?: Child care as a gauge
Nyberg, Anita, 2001
Social Politics, 8(2), 206-209

An examination of the correlation between the state of publicly funded child care and Sweden’s support of a dual breadwinner household model

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Making child care ''affordable'' in the United States
Bergmann, Barbara R., 1999
Social Politics, 6(2), 245-262

A discussion of models of two federally financed plans for helping to make quality child care affordable for American families

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''Our greatest treasure, the child'': The politics of child care in Hungary, 1945-1956
Bicskei, Éva, 2006
Social Politics, 13(2), 151-188

A historical analysis of Hungary's child care policies from 1945 to 1956, focusing on how child care was organized, funding methods, quality of educational facilities, and provisions in terms of maternal employment

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Paid to care: The origins and effects of care leave policies in Western Europe
Morgan, Kimberly J., 2003
Social Politics, 10(1), 49-85

An examination of the origins of paid family-related work leaves and their impact on families in Austria, Finland, France, Germany, and Norway

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Paradoxes of new labour social policy: Toward universal child care in Europe's ''most liberal'' welfare regime?
Wincott, Daniel, 2006
Social Politics, 13(2), 286-312

An examination of recent developments in child care policy (including universal child care provision) in England, comparing these developments with similar policy innovations in Scotland and Wales

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The politics of ideals of care: Danish and Flemish child care policy compared
Kremer, Monique, 2006
Social Politics, 13(2), 261-285

A study of how the universal child care provision policy in Denmark developed as compared to the development of state-subsidized care in Belgium

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The ''production'' of child care: How labor markets shape social policy and vice versa
Morgan, Kimberly J., 2005
Social Politics, 12(2), 243-263

A comparison of how the relationship between child care policy and labor market structures in Sweden, France, and the United States shape human services policy in each country

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Rationales of care in contemporary welfare states: The case of childcare in the Netherlands
Bussemaker, Jet, 1998
Social Politics, 5(1), 70-96

An exploration of child care policies in the Netherlands since the 1960’s as it relates to gender, child care and its three rationales- a moral, an interest, and an efficiency rationale- and the larger welfare state

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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