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After-school program attendance and the social development of rural Latino children of immigrant families
Riggs, Nathaniel R., 2006
Journal of Community Psychology, 34(1), 75-87

A study of the influence of attendance on the social outcomes of Latino elementary school children who participated in an academically-oriented after school program, based on attendance records and teacher, parent, and child questionnaires

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The Be A Star community-based after-school program: Developing resiliency factors in high-risk preadolescent youth
Pierce, Lois H., 1998
Journal of Community Psychology, 26(2), 175-183

A description of the Be a Star community-based after-school program and an evaluation of its effectiveness in helping children develop decision making skills, feelings of personal competence, cultural awareness, and refusal skills

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Early Head Start home visitation: The role of implementation in bolstering program benefits
Harden, Brenda Jones, May, 2012
Journal of Community Psychology, 40(4), 438-455

Home visitation has emerged as a key strategy for promoting child and family well-being in the current policy context. This article examines the effectiveness of the Early Head Start (EHS) home-based program for children and families at the end of the program and 2 years later, with a particular focus on the role of program implementation in the impacts of the EHS home-based program on child and family outcomes. There was a pattern of broad, modest effects of EHS home visiting for both children and parents, which were strengthened if the programs were fully implemented according to federal guidelines. In particular, impacts for children in the cognitive and language domain were documented. Implications of these findings for policy and practice are discussed. (author abstract)

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Impacts of the duration of Head Start enrollment on children's academic outcomes: Moderation effects of family risk factors and earlier outcomes
Lee, Kyunghee, August, 2011
Journal of Community Psychology, 39(6), 698-716

Studies of the relationships between duration of Head Start enrollment and children's academic outcomes, including an examination of the moderating influence of multiple family risk factors, based on data from the 1,260 3- and 4-year-old children from 60 Head Start classrooms

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Job Rewards and Concerns Scale
Marshall, Nancy L., 1992
Journal of Community Psychology, 20(1), 36-42

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Maternal engagement in a home visiting intervention: What lies beneath psychological resources?
Booth, Ailbhe, January, 2014
Journal of Community Psychology, 42(1), 29-46

This study examined the factors influencing participant engagement in a home visiting program. Specifically, it explored the relationship between dosage and the constituent components of psychological resources: mental health, mastery, and cognitive resources. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted utilising implementation data from a sample (n = 95) of participants in an Irish home visiting program. Psychological resources significantly predicted dosage, yet an investigation of each component found that only cognitive resources remained significant. Furthermore, when considering types of cognitive resources, verbal ability was found to significantly predict the number of home visits but not the average duration of visits. Conversely, perceptual reasoning was found to predict the average duration of home visits but not the number of home visits. These results suggest that cognitive resources may be the driving component behind previous findings that link psychological resources and level of dosage in home visiting programs. Practice and policy implications are explored. (author abstract)

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Neighborhood Characteristics Questionnaire
Barnes, Jacqueline, November 1997
Journal of Community Psychology, 25(6), 551-566

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Parent involvement in education as a moderator of family and neighborhood socioeconomic context on school readiness among young children
Kingston, Sharon, April, 2013
Journal of Community Psychology, 41(3), 265-276

Limited socioeconomic family and neighborhood resources are known to influence multiple aspects of school readiness skills. Early parent involvement in education is hypothesized to attenuate risk for academic underachievement related to socioeconomic disadvantage. The current study used multilevel modeling to test whether parent involvement moderates the effects of family and neighborhood level socioeconomic resources on school readiness among a sample of 171 urban 4-year-olds. Parent involvement moderated the effect of family and neighborhood socioeconomic resources on the social-emotional-behavioral components of school readiness. Increased parent involvement in education was related to lower rates of behavior problems among children of single parents and among children from neighborhoods with higher levels of childcare burden In contrast, parent involvement did not moderate the relation between socioeconomic risk and cognitive-academic components of school readiness skills. (author abstract)

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Relationships with Other People Questionnaire
Marshall, Nancy L., 1991
Journal of Community Psychology, 21(1), 64-77

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School Sentiment Inventory
Bogat, G. Anne, October 1980
Journal of Community Psychology, 8(4), 343-352

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Social Support Measures
Chen, Shu-Pi C., 1995
Journal of Community Psychology, 23(1), 28-33

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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