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Aligning the construction zones of parents and teachers for mathematics reform
Lehrer, Richard, 1997
Cognition and Instruction, 15(1), 41-83

A study of home-school alignment for mathematics reform in the primary grades

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Constructing literacy in the kindergarten: Task structure, collaboration, and motivation
Nolen, Susan Bobbitt, 2001
Cognition and Instruction, 19(1), 95-142

An exploration into children’s motivation to learn to read and write and its contribution to the meaning of reading and writing for children, based on information gathered from classroom observations of four kindergarten teachers in three suburban schools and their students

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How reading begins: A study of preschoolers' print identification strategies
Share, David L., 1999
Cognition and Instruction, 17(2), 177-213

An examination of the casual influence of phonological alphabetic skills on preschool word identification abilities, based on a sample of 30 preschool age children in northern Israel

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Instruction, understanding, and skill in multidigit addition and subtraction
Hiebert, James, 1996
Cognition and Instruction, 14(3), 251-283

A survey of the relationship between elementary children’s cognitive understanding of multidigit numbers and their computational skill over a three year period in a suburban-rural school

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Science literacy in school and home contexts: Kindergarteners' science achievement and motivation
Mantzicopoulos, Panayota, January, 2013
Cognition and Instruction, 31(1), 62-119

We examined science learning and motivation outcomes as a function of children's participation in the classroom and classroom-plus-home components of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP). The sample was comprised of kindergarten children in 4 low income, neighboring schools. Children in Schools 1 and 2 (n = 120) participated in the SLP science activities. Of these children, 79 participated in the classroom component of the SLP whereas 41 participated in both the classroom and home components. A comparison group of children in schools 3 and 4 (n = 74) participated in regular science activities. We identified science learning, achievement, and motivational benefits for the SLP groups. Additional benefits for children who participated in both the classroom and home components of the SLP were greater gains in general science knowledge, higher levels of positive self-competence beliefs for science, perceived family support for learning science, and independence for learning science. (author abstract)

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"We learn how to predict and be a scientist": Early science experiences and kindergarten children's social meanings about science
Mantzicopoulos, Panayota, 2009
Cognition and Instruction, 27(4), 312-369

We examine kindergarten children's emerging social meanings about science as a function of their participation in integrated science inquiry and literacy activities associated with the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP).We describe changes in 123 SLP kindergarten children's narrative accounts of learning science in school during three different time periods: (a) in September, before the onset of SLP activities; (b) in December, after children had participated in 17 lessons associated with 4 SLP units; and (c) in March, after children had participated in an additional 13 lessons associated with the SLP Marine Life unit. At the end of the year, we: (a) compare SLP children's narratives about science to those of a group of children (n = 70) who only experienced the regular kindergarten program; and (b) examine differences between SLP and comparison children's reports on a measure of learning activities in kindergarten that include science as well as privileged content areas such as reading, writing, and learning about numbers and shapes. Results support the conclusion that sustained and meaningful participation in conceptually coherent science programs is crucial for children to develop meanings about science as a distinct academic domain that comprises its own disciplinary content, language, and processes. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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