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A comparison of school readiness outcomes for children randomly assigned to a Head Start program and the program's wait list
Abbott-Shim, Martha, 2003
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 8(2), 191-214

A study on the effect of Head Start program participation on school readiness, based on a sample of 132 four year old children from three Head Start Centers in a southern urban setting

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Early childhood intervention and educational attainment: Age 22 findings from the Chicago Longitudinal Study
Ou, Suh-Ruu, 2006
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 11(2), 175-198

A study of the long-term effects of participation in the Chicago Child-Parent Center (CPC) Preschool program on educational attainment in young adults

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The effects of story reading programs on literacy and language development of disadvantaged preschoolers
Karweit, Nancy, 1996
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 1(4), 319-348

An examination of research evidence on the effects of preschool reading practices, such as story book reading, on young children, particularly the effects of school-based programs for young disadvantaged children

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Getting ready for school: Piloting universal prekindergarten in an urban county
Fischer, Robert Louis, 2013
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 18(2), 128-140

Investments in high-quality early care and education have been shown to reap societal benefits across the lives of the children served. A key intervention point is in the lives of 3- to 5-year olds during the period prior to entering kindergarten. Many jurisdictions have developed broad-based prekindergarten initiatives. This study reports on a pilot universal prekindergarten program in 24 sites in the Cleveland, Ohio area. Child assessment data were collected on 204 children from early care classrooms for 3- to 5-year olds across 3 time points by trained observers using 2 standardized instruments. Changes in achievement scores were shown to be significantly predicted by race, parental education level, and whether the family spoke English as a second language, with largest gains shown among children who were most behind at baseline. The findings serve to illuminate the developmental trajectory of children before kindergarten and how data can be used to inform practice and policy. (author abstract)

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Inequities in early care and education: What is America buying?
Sachs, Jason, 2000
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 5(4), 383-395

An article examining the relationship between child care quality and family income by analyzing the differences between programs located in low-, middle-, and high-income areas in Boston.

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Influence of culture-related experiences and sociodemographic risk factors on cognitive readiness among preschoolers
Beasley, T. Mark, 2002
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 7(1), 3-23

A study examining the effect of sociodemographic characteristics on preschool children's school readiness using a sample of nationally representative data from the National Household Education Survey, 1993

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[Review of the book Telling a different story: Teaching and literacy in an urban preschool]
Chamberlain, Anne M., 2002
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 7(3), 357-360

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The Voyager Universal Literacy System: Results from a study of kindergarten students in inner-city schools
Frechtling, Joy A., 2006
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 11(1), 75-95

A quasi-experimental evaluation of the impact of Voyager Universal Literacy System on kindergartners early reading skills

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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