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Child-care satisfaction: Linkages to work attitudes, interrole conflict, and maternal separation anxiety
Buffardi, Louis C., 1997
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2(1), 84-96

A study of the relationship of caregiver attentiveness, dependability and communication to child care satisfaction in mothers, and the relationship of maternal child care satisfaction to maternal separation anxiety, work attitude and interrole conflict

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Can on-site childcare have detrimental work outcomes?: Examining the moderating roles of family supportive organization perceptions and childcare satisfaction
Ratnasingam, Prema, October, 2012
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 17(4), 435-444

A study of the moderating roles of both perceptions of organizational family support and satisfaction with child care providers on the relationship between type of child care use--on-site or external--and both work engagement and job satisfaction, based on data from 143 employees at a large public university in the Southern United States

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The impact of dependent-care responsibility and gender on work attitudes
Buffardi, Louis C., 1999
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 4(4), 356-367

An analysis of the impact of child care, elder care, and gender on work-family balance and various facets of job satisfaction in a survey questionnaire among federal employees in dual-income households

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