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The changing availability of grandparents as carers and its implications for childcare policy in the UK
Gray, Anne, 2005
Journal of Social Policy, 34(4), 557-577

An analysis of the role of grandparents as child care providers in the United Kingdom and its impact on the employment decisions of mothers of young children, based on data from the UK Time Use Survey and the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS)

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Childcare policy and local partnerships under Labour
Penn, Helen, 2005
Journal of Social Policy, 34(1), 79-97

A discussion of the policy outcomes of Englandís National Childcare Strategy and EYDCPs (Early Years Development and Childcare Partnerships)

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Choice and the relationship between identities and behaviour for mothers with pre-school children: Some implications for policy from a UK study
Himmelweit, Susan, 2004
Journal of Social Policy, 33(3), 455-478

A discussion of issues concerning child care arrangements and mothersí employment decisions, based on a study of 34 mothers of preschool children in Milton Keynes, England

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Combining employment with childcare: An escape from dependence?
Ward, Clare, 1996
Journal of Social Policy, 25(2), 223-247

An assessment of the role of child care in womenís financial independence and labor-force participation, using information from the National Child Development Study, 1991

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The dilemma of municipalities: Scandinavian approach to child day-care provision
Kroger, Teppo, 1997
Journal of Social Policy, 26(4), 485-507

An examination of child care and other social service policies and their implementation by local governments in four Scandinavian countries

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Doing it for the kids?: The determinants of attitudes towards public childcare in unified Germany
Goerres, Achim, April, 2012
Journal of Social Policy, 41(2), 349-372

A study of population characteristics associated with differing attitudes towards public child care provision in Germany, including socialization in either East or West Germany, political ideology, family involvement, and self interest, based on data from the 2002 German General Social Survey and the 2008-2009 European Social Survey

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The effects of early years' childcare on child emotional and behavioural difficulties in lone and co-parent family situations
Zagel, Hannah, April, 2013
Journal of Social Policy, 42(2), 235-258

With targeted childcare initiatives and welfare-to-work programmes policy-makers have sought to address employment activation of lone mothers and negative outcomes for children in lone parent households. The present study examines non-parental childcare use and maternal employment among children living in lone and co-parent family situations at ages three and four and emotional and behavioural difficulties at ages four and five. The results demonstrate that negative outcomes associated with lone motherhood are explained largely by mother's age, education, material circumstances and area deprivation; and that maternal employment does not relieve lone mothers' disadvantages in a way that alleviates the risks of difficulties to their children. However, in any family constellation, mainly group-based formal pre-school childcare does have a positive impact on child difficulties compared to drawing on informal childcare arrangements as main provider. In addition, and specifically for the difficulties of children in lone mother family situations, any non-parental childcare -- formal or informal -- for at least twenty-five hours per week is beneficial. Study findings support policy agendas which tackle families' material hardship beyond promoting mothers' employment, and through investment in formal childcare provision, and also through arrangements allowing lone mothers to divide their weekly load of childcare with another main provider. (author abstract)

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Feminism and child daycare
Randall, Vicky, 1996
Journal of Social Policy, 25(5), 485-505

An article exploring why feminist mobilization around the issue of child care in Great Britain has been generally weak and unproductive

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From Sure Start to Children's Centres: An analysis of policy change in English Early Years programmes
Lewis, Jane, January, 2011
Journal of Social Policy, 40(1), 71-88

A policy study of the transition from Sure Start and children's services for disadvantaged areas to the establishment of Children's Centers, a universal early care and education program in the United Kingdom, based on data from policy documents, from the findings of the National Evaluation of Sure Start interviews

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'Grandparents are the next best thing': Informal childcare for working parents in urban Britain
Wheelock, Jane, 2002
Journal of Social Policy, 31(3), 441-463

An British investigation of the contribution that relatives, friends or neighbors looking after children, makes in allowing parents to go out to work

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The impact of market forces on child care provision: Insights from the 2005 Child Care Act in the Netherlands
Noally, Joelle, July 2009
Journal of Social Policy, 38(3), 477-498

A comparison of the supply of child care in the Netherlands in 1999-2001 and after the introduction of the 2005 Child Care Act and an analysis of changes in the provision of child care by not-for-profit and for-profit child care providers over the same time period from the General Firm Registry on the location and legal status of child care facilities

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Policy and practice in childcare and nursery education
Penn, Helen, 2000
Journal of Social Policy, 29(1), 37-54

A case study evaluating the policy and practices of five child care programs which attempted to integrate the three strands of nursery education, child care, and welfare care for vulnerable children in the United Kingdom

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Political motherhood and the everyday experience of mothering: A comparison of the child care strategies of French and British working mothers
Windebank, Jan, 1999
Journal of Social Policy, 28(1), 1-25

A comparison of the similarities and differences in child care strategies and ideologies between French and British mothers

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[Review of the book A new deal for children?: Re-forming education and care in England, Scotland and Sweden]
Cockburn, Tom, 2005
Journal of Social Policy, 34(2), 333-334

A review of an investigation of child care policy based on interviews with public agencies, trade unions, voluntary organisations and visits to nine local authorities based on case studies of England, Scotland and Sweden

Book Reviews


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Trap for women or freedom to choose?: The struggle over cash for child care schemes in Finland and Sweden
Hiilamo, Heikki, July 2009
Journal of Social Policy, 38(3), 457-475

A historical overview of cash for child care policy approaches to child home care from political debates from parliamentary proceedings, party programs and other family policy publications in Finland and Sweden from the 1930s to post 2000

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Trust and early years childcare: Parents' relationships with private, state and third sector providers in England
Roberts, Jonathan, October, 2011
Journal of Social Policy, 40(4), 695-715

A qualitative study of factors associated with parental trust of child care centers, such as private or public sector status and center reputation, based on interviews with 27 London parents

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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