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Boom in day care industry the result of many social changes
Goodman, William, 1995
Monthly Labor Review, 118(8), 3-12

An account of the growth in the child care industry from the 1970s until the early 1990s, based on data from the Current Employment Statistics program of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)

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Child care: Arrangements and costs
Veum, Jonathan, 1991
Monthly Labor Review, 114(10), 10-17

An exploration of child care arrangements and costs based a number of National Longitudinal Surveys

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Child-care problems: An obstacle to work
Cattan, Peter, 1991
Monthly Labor Review, 114(10), 3-9

A survey to determine young mothers’ obstacles to employment who were out of the labor force for at least part of 1986, derived from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth

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Marriage, children, and women's employment: What do we know?
Cohen, Philip N., 1999
Monthly Labor Review, 122(12), 22-31

An examination of women’s involvement, particularly married women, in paid employment, focusing on paid employment and child care in the context of recent welfare reform

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The work schedules of low-educated American women and welfare reform
Presser, Harriet B., 1997
Monthly Labor Review, 120(4), 25-34

An examination of the relationship between the nonstandard work schedules of low-educated mothers and the availability of child care and welfare reform

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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