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Diarrhea & child care

Resource Type: Fact Sheets & Briefs
Author(s): Churchill, Robin; Pickering, Larry K.;
Date Issued: 1998
Publisher(s): National Center for Early Development & Learning (U.S.)
Description: A study of measures to help control and prevent diarrheal disease in child care center environments
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Funder(s): United States. Office of Educational Research and Improvement
Source: (NCEDL Spotlights No. 4). Chapel Hill, NC: National Center for Early Development and Learning. Retrieved August 31, 2005, from http://www.fpg.unc.edu/%7encedl/pages/spotlt4.cfm
Topics: Child Care & Early Education Providers/Organizations > Provider Type/Setting > Center-Based Child Care & Early Education

Programs, Interventions & Curricula > Interventions/Curricula > Physical & Mental Health, Safety & Nutrition

Policies > Physical & Mental Health & Safety
Country: United States
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