Addressing disruptive behaviors in the preschool classroom: An adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for Head Start teachers

Author(s): Collett, Brent R.
Date Issued: 2002
Description: A study describing the development, implementation, and evaluation of an early intervention program designed to improve teaching strategies and practices for Head Start children with behavioral problems

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