Assessing costs and benefits of early childhood intervention programs: Overview and application to the Starting Early Starting Smart program: Executive summary

Resource Type: Executive Summary
Author(s): Karoly, Lynn A.; Kilburn, M. Rebecca; Bigelow, James H.; Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Cannon, Jill S.; Chiesa, James;
Date Issued: 2001
Publisher(s): Casey Family Programs; Rand Corporation
Description: A report summarizing the methodological issues in developing a cost benefit analysis for early childhood programs and their implications for the Starting Early Starting Smart intervention.

Related Resources

what is this? Related Resources include summaries, versions, or components of the currently selected resource, documents encompassing or employing it, or datasets/measures used in its creation.

Assessing costs and benefits of early childhood intervention programs: Overview and applications to the Starting Early Starting Smart program Reports & Papers


More Like This

what is this? These resources were found by comparing the title, description, and topics of the currently selected resource to the rest of the Research Connections holdings.

Identifying instructional targets for early childhood via authentic assessment: Alignment of professional standards and practice-based evidence Other
The effectiveness of early childhood development programs: A systematic review Literature Review
The costs and benefits of earlier identification and effective intervention: Final report Reports & Papers
Quasi-experimental estimates of the effects of a preschool intervention Reports & Papers
Directions for cost and outcome analysis of Starting Early Starting Smart: Summary of a cost expert meeting Other

Disclaimer: Use of the above resource is governed by Research Connections' Terms of Use.

Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate