Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity Temperament Survey, Wave 1, 1994-1995

Resource Type: Data Sets
Author(s): Earls, Felton; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Sampson, Robert;
Date Issued: 2005
Description: A large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development specifically focusing on the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors such as the causes and pathways of juvenile delinquency, adult crime, substance abuse, and violence and the environments in which these social behaviors took place.
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Funder(s): John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation ; United States. Child Care Bureau ; Irving B. Harris Foundation ; United States. Head Start Bureau ; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.) ; National Institute of Justice (U.S.) ; National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.) ; United States. Office of Educational Research and Improvement ; Turner Foundation, inc ; National Institute on Early Childhood Development and Education (U.S.)
Alernative Title: PHDCN EASI, 1994-1995
Source: Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity Temperament Survey, Wave 1, 1994-1995 [Computer file]. ICPSR13586-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-08. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13586.v1
Note: The Murray Research Center conducted the initial data and documentation processing for this collection.
Topics: Children & Child Development > Child Development & School Readiness

Parent, School, & Community School Readiness/Child School Success & Performance

Parents & Families
Research Design:

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods

The city of Chicago was selected as the research site for the PHDCN because of its extensive racial, ethnic, and social-class diversity. The project collapsed 847 census tracts in the city of Chicago into 343 neighborhood clusters (NCs) based upon seven groupings of racial/ethnic composition and three levels of socioeconomic status. The NCs were designed to be ecologically meaningful. They were composed of geographically contiguous census tracts and geographic boundaries, and knowledge of Chicago's neighborhoods were considered in the definition of the NCs. Each NC was comprised of approximately 8,000 people.

Longitudinal Cohort Study

For the Longitudinal Cohort Study, a stratified probability sample of 80 neighborhoods was selected. The 80 NCs were sampled from the 21 strata (seven racial/ethnic groups by three socioeconomic levels) with the goal of representing the 21 cells as equally as possible to eliminate the confounding between racial/ethnic mix and socioeconomic status. Once the 80 NCs were chosen, then block groups were selected at random within each of the sample neighborhoods. A complete listing of dwelling units was collected for all sampled block groups. Pregnant women, children, and young adults in seven age cohorts (birth, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 years) were identified through in-person screening of approximately 40,000 dwelling units within the 80 NCs. The screening response rate was 80 percent. Children within six months of the birthday that qualified them for the sample were selected for inclusion in the Longitudinal Cohort Study. A total of 8,347 participants were identified through the screening. Of the eligible study participants, 6,228 were interviewed.

For all cohorts except 0 and 18, primary caregivers as well as the child were interviewed. The primary caregiver was the person found to spend the most time taking care of the child. Separate research assistants administered the primary caregiver interviews and the child interviews. The primary method of data collection was face-to-face interviewing, although participants who refused to complete the personal interview were administered a phone interview. Interviews were conducted in Spanish, English, and Polish. In Wave 1 the complete protocol was translated into Spanish and Polish. An interpreter was hired for participants who spoke a language other than English, Spanish, or Polish. Depending on the age and wave of data collection, participants were paid between $5 and $20 per interview. Other incentives, such as free passes to museums, the aquarium, and monthly drawing prizes were also included.

Interview protocols included a wide range of questions. For example, some questions assessed impulse control and sensation-seeking traits, cognitive and language development, leisure activities, delinquency and substance abuse, friends' activities, and self-perception, attitudes, and values. Caregivers were also interviewed about family structure, parent characteristics, parent-child relationships, parent discipline styles, family mental health, and family history of criminal behavior and drug use.

Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity (EASI) Temperament Survey

There have been several versions of the Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity (EASI) Temperament survey, however each successive version attempted to measure the temperamental inclinations of the respondents being observed. The EASI Temperament Survey as it appeared in the PHDCN Longitudinal Cohort Study was a 40-item questionnaire that obtained information about the participant's tendencies regarding four temperaments: sociability, activity, emotionality, and impulsivity. It was administered to parents of subjects, ages 3 to 15. Subjects, age 18, completed the survey for themselves. The response format for questionnaire portion of the EASI Temperament Survey was 1 = uncharacteristic, 2 = somewhat uncharacteristic, 3 = neither, 4 = somewhat characteristic, and 5 = characteristic. Respondents were required to select one and only one answer for each question. The mean response of various questions was taken to form ten different scales that assessed distinct aspects of the subject's temperamental makeup. Scores ranged from 1 to 5 with higher scores suggesting that the particular trait was more characteristic of the subject being observed.

Date of Collection: 1994--1997
Period Coverage: 1994--1997
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