CCDF and 21CCLC state efforts to facilitate coordination for afterschool programs

Resource Type: Other
Author(s): Afterschool Investments Project;
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher(s): Finance Project (U.S.); National Governors' Association
Description: A comparison of the Twenty-first Century Community Learning Centers and the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), with a discussion of ways to combine these funds to support afterschool programs.
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Preparer(s): Jones, Michelle Ganow
Funder(s): United States. Child Care Bureau
Source: Washington, DC: Finance Project. Retrieved January 17, 2008, from the Afterschool Investments Project Web site: http://www.nccic.org/afterschool/CCDF21CCLC.pdf (no longer accessible since March 9, 2012)
Topics: Policies > Coordination & Integration

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