Afterschool keeps kids safe

Author(s): Afterschool Alliance;
Date Issued: 2002
Publisher(s): Afterschool Alliance
Description: An issue brief that discusses why participation in after school programs reduces a child's chance of using drugs and committing or becoming a victim of juvenile crime
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Source: (Afterschool Alert Issue Brief No. 7). Washington, DC: Afterschool Alliance. Retrieved October 24, 2005, from http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/issue_briefs/issue_safe_7.pdf
Topics: Child Care & Early Education Market > Economic & Societal Impact > Crime Prevention

Programs, Interventions & Curricula > Programs > Out-Of-School Time
Country: United States
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