Is subsidized childcare associated with lower risk of grade retention for low-income children? Evidence from Child Care and Development Fund administrative records linked to the American Community Survey

Resource Type: Reports & Papers
Author(s): Shattuck, Rachel M.;
Date Issued: June, 2017
Publisher(s): U.S. Census Bureau. Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications
Description: This study investigates whether low-income young children's experience of Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)-subsidized childcare is associated with a lower subsequent likelihood of being held back in grades K-12. High-quality childcare has been shown to improve low-income children's school readiness. However, no previous study has examined the link specifically between subsidized care and grade retention. I do so here by matching information on children from CCDF administrative records to later observations of the same children in the American Community Survey (ACS). I use logistic regression to compare the likelihood of grade retention between CCDF-recipient children and non-recipient children who also appear in the ACS in the years 2008-2014 (N=2,284,857). I find strong evidence for an association between CCDF-subsidized care and lower risk of grade retention, especially among non-Hispanic Black children and Hispanic children. I also find evidence that receiving CCDF-subsidized center-based care in particular is associated with a lower risk of being held back than CCDF-subsidized family daycare, babysitter care, or relative care, again with the largest apparent benefit to non-Hispanic Black children and Hispanic children. (author abstract)
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Source: (CARRA Working Paper Series Working Paper 2017-06). Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications. Retrieved from https://census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/working-papers/2017/adrm/carra-wp-2017-06.pdf
Note: This resource is based on data from Child Care and Development Fund administrative records (fiscal years 2004-2011) and the American Community Survey (ACS) (2008-2014).
Topics: Parent, School, & Community School Readiness/Child School Success & Performance > School Performance & Success

Child Care & Early Education Providers/Organizations > Provider Type/Setting

Policies > Child Care & Early Education Policies > Subsidies
Country: United States
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