Welfare reform, work, and child care: The role of informal care in the lives of low-income women and children

Author(s): Knox, Virginia; London, Andrew S.; Scott, Ellen K.; Blank, Susan;
Date Issued: 2003
Publisher(s): MDRC
Description: A brief documenting the challenges low-income families face as they use both formal and informal arrangements to meet their child care needs
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Funder(s): Annie E. Casey Foundation ; David & Lucile Packard Foundation ; William T. Grant Foundation ; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation ; J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation
Source: (The Next Generation Policy Brief). New York: MDRC. Retrieved October 25, 2005, from http://www.mdrc.org/publications/353/policybrief.pdf
Note: This resource is part of the Next Generation project
Topics: Parents & Families > Selection Of Child Care & Early Education Arrangements

Policies > Child Care & Early Education Policies > Subsidies

Policies > Economic & Social Policies
Country: United States
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