A Nordic perspective on early childhood education and care policy

Resource Type: Other
Author(s): Karila, Kirsti
Date Issued: December, 2012
Description: A description of key features of Nordic early childhood education and care policies and their current trends, including the use of highly trained staff and the provision of universal services
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Journal Title: European Journal of Education
Volume Number: 47
Issue Number: 4
Page Range: 584-595
Topics: International Child Care & Early Education

Policies

Policies > Child Care & Early Education Policies > Universal Provision
ISSN: 1465-3435 Online
0141-8211 Paper
Peer Reviewed: yes
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