Children, caregiving, culture, and community: Understanding the place and importance of kith and kin care in the White Mountain Apache community

Resource Type: Reports & Papers
Author(s): Sparks, Shannon Michelle Anjeanette;
Date Issued: 2007
Description: An ethnographic study of the values and circumstances influencing the child care decisions of members of the White Mountain Apache community, with particular attention to both cultural differences in perceptions of quality care and the trends related to the use of family, friend, and neighbor care, based on interviews, observations, and discussions with several dozen parents and care providers

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Informal Caregiving Among the White Mountain Apache and its Impact on Child Health and Well Being Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


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