The ABC of child care politics

Author(s): Brennan, Deborah
Date Issued: Winter 2007
Description: A study of the growth of private and for-profit child care services, the adequacy of regulations and standards, the cost of care, and the implications for both politics and public policy, with an argument for a more robust approach to regulation and quality control due to the emergence of ABC Learning as the dominant corporate provider of child care services in Australia
show entire record ↓
Journal Title: Australian Journal of Social Issues
Volume Number: 42
Issue Number: 2
Page Range: 213-225
Topics: International Child Care & Early Education > Single-Country Studies

Policies

Financing & Funding
ISSN: 0157-6321 Paper
Peer Reviewed: yes
hide record ↑


More Like This

what is this? These resources were found by comparing the title, description, and topics of the currently selected resource to the rest of the Research Connections holdings.

Examining parental and staff perceptions of childcare service quality across competing business structures Reports & Papers
Discourses of professional identity in early childhood: Movements in Australia Other
Hindsight from Australia: Foresight for BC Fact Sheets & Briefs
Social investment or private profit?: Diverging notions of 'investment' in early childhood education and care Other
Employees' views on quality Reports & Papers

Disclaimer: Use of the above resource is governed by Research Connections' Terms of Use.

Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate