Accessing and affording child care and low-income mothers' employment over time: An ecological approach

Author(s): Shjegstad, Brinn
Date Issued: 2009
Description: A study of the influence of child problem behaviors and maternal risk factors on low-income mothers’ ability to access and afford child care, an examination of family income as a mediator of the relationships between child problem behaviors, maternal risk factors and low-income mothers’ ability to access and afford child care, and an examination of the relationships between low-income mothers’ ability to access and afford child care and family income, child problem behaviors, maternal risk factors, and ability to obtain and maintain employment

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