Differential exposure to early childhood education services and mother-toddler interaction

Author(s): Klebanov, Pamela Kato; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne;
Date Issued: Q2 2008
Publisher(s): Elsevier Science (Firm)
Description: A study of the effect of early childhood education services on toddler task persistence and enthusiasm, as well as maternal authoritarian behavior and support stimulation, among a sample of 880 families participating in the Infant Health and Development Program in eight states
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Journal Title: Early Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume Number: 23
Issue Number: 2
Page Range: 213-232
Topics: Programs, Interventions & Curricula > Interventions/Curricula > Infant & Toddler
Country: United States
ISSN: 0885-2006 Paper
1873-7706 Online
Peer Reviewed: yes
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