Does the neighborhood context alter the link between youth's after-school time activities and developmental outcomes? A multilevel analysis

Author(s): Fauth, Rebecca; Roth, Jodie L.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne;
Date Issued: May, 2007
Publisher(s): American Psychological Association
Description: A longitudinal analysis of the links between neighborhood characteristics and participation in after school activities, and anxiety/depression, delinquency, and substance use among a sample of 9- and 12-year-old youths, using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN)
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Funder(s): William T. Grant Foundation
Journal Title: Developmental Psychology
Volume Number: 43
Issue Number: 3
Page Range: 760-777
Topics: Children & Child Development

Programs, Interventions & Curricula > Programs > Out-Of-School Time
Country: United States
States: ILLINOIS
ISSN: 0012-1649 Paper
1939-0599 Online
Peer Reviewed: yes
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