Barriers to Child Care Subsidies

Resource Type: Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects
Principal Investigator(s): Shlay, Anne B.; Weinraub, Marsha;
Date Issued: 2000
Description: A project consisting of three related studies. The first utilizes focus groups and a standardized survey with subsidy eligible families to examine subsidy use among low-income families. The second surveys low-income families to explore how child care preferences may be related to race and culture. The third uses observational measures to examine the quality of kith and kin care for families who do not use subsidies. This research provides policy-relevant information about developing subsidy policies that are sensitive to the contextual and cultural differences among low-income families.
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Related Resources

what is this? Related Resources include summaries, versions, or components of the currently selected resource, documents encompassing or employing it, or datasets/measures used in its creation.

How low-income African American mothers evaluate child care arrangements: A factorial survey analysis of parent preferences, fair market value, and willingness to pay [Executive summary] Executive Summary
Barriers to subsidies: Reasons why low income families do not use child care subsidies Reports & Papers
Barriers to subsidies: Reasons why low-income families do not use child care subsidies Reports & Papers
How parents evaluate child care: A factorial survey analysis of perceptions of child care quality, fair market price and willingness to pay by low-income, African American mothers Reports & Papers
How low-income African American mothers evaluate child care arrangements: A factorial survey analysis of parent preferences, fair market value, and willingness to pay Reports & Papers
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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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