Assessing child-care quality with a telephone interview

Resource Type: Reports & Papers
Author(s): Holloway, Susan D.; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Fuller, Bruce; Tsou, Lynna; Carroll, Jude;
Date Issued: 2001
Publisher(s): Elsevier Science (Firm)
Description: A test of the viability of telephone surveys as an alternative to direct observation methods to assess quality in child care sites, based on a comparison of assessments of 89 family child-care homes and 92 centers using both methods
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Funder(s): David & Lucile Packard Foundation
Journal Title: Early Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume Number: 16
Issue Number: 2
Page Range: 165-189
Topics: Research & Evaluation Methods

Child Care & Early Education Quality
Country: United States
States: CALIFORNIA, CONNECTICUT
ISSN: 0885-2006 Paper
1873-7706 Online
Unit Of Analysis: Organization (child care site)
Universe: Licensed child care sites, both in-home and center-based, from selected zip codes in the San Francisco Bay Area in California and several, unspecified communities in Connecticut.
Peer Reviewed: yes
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